Hot Best Seller

The Annotated Hans Christian Andersen

Availability: Ready to download

A richly entertaining and informative collection of Hans Christian Andersen's stories, annotated by one of America's leading folklore scholars. In her most ambitious annotated work to date, Maria Tatar celebrates the stories told by Denmark's "perfect wizard" and re-envisions Hans Christian Andersen as a writer who casts his spell on both children and adults. Andersen's A richly entertaining and informative collection of Hans Christian Andersen's stories, annotated by one of America's leading folklore scholars. In her most ambitious annotated work to date, Maria Tatar celebrates the stories told by Denmark's "perfect wizard" and re-envisions Hans Christian Andersen as a writer who casts his spell on both children and adults. Andersen's most beloved tales, such as "The Emperor's New Clothes," "The Ugly Duckling," and "The Little Mermaid," are now joined by "The Shadow" and "Story of a Mother," mature stories that reveal his literary range and depth. Tatar captures the tales' unrivaled dramatic and visual power, showing exactly how Andersen became one of the world's ten most translated authors, along with Shakespeare, Dickens, and Marx. Lushly illustrated with more than one hundred fifty rare images, many in full color, by artists such as Arthur Rackham and Edmund Dulac, The Annotated Hans Christian Andersen will captivate readers with annotations that explore the rich social and cultural dimensions of the nineteenth century and construct a compelling portrait of a writer whose stories still fascinate us today. .


Compare

A richly entertaining and informative collection of Hans Christian Andersen's stories, annotated by one of America's leading folklore scholars. In her most ambitious annotated work to date, Maria Tatar celebrates the stories told by Denmark's "perfect wizard" and re-envisions Hans Christian Andersen as a writer who casts his spell on both children and adults. Andersen's A richly entertaining and informative collection of Hans Christian Andersen's stories, annotated by one of America's leading folklore scholars. In her most ambitious annotated work to date, Maria Tatar celebrates the stories told by Denmark's "perfect wizard" and re-envisions Hans Christian Andersen as a writer who casts his spell on both children and adults. Andersen's most beloved tales, such as "The Emperor's New Clothes," "The Ugly Duckling," and "The Little Mermaid," are now joined by "The Shadow" and "Story of a Mother," mature stories that reveal his literary range and depth. Tatar captures the tales' unrivaled dramatic and visual power, showing exactly how Andersen became one of the world's ten most translated authors, along with Shakespeare, Dickens, and Marx. Lushly illustrated with more than one hundred fifty rare images, many in full color, by artists such as Arthur Rackham and Edmund Dulac, The Annotated Hans Christian Andersen will captivate readers with annotations that explore the rich social and cultural dimensions of the nineteenth century and construct a compelling portrait of a writer whose stories still fascinate us today. .

30 review for The Annotated Hans Christian Andersen

  1. 5 out of 5

    D.M.

    I got this book largely because I felt it was time I had an Andersen collection, and figured the annotations couldn't hurt. While this is a decent group of his stories, gathering the obvious with the less so and dividing them with little regard into Stories for Children and Stories for Adults, I can't say I enjoyed Maria Tatar's notes. My main beef with the annotations is that they're far too analytic for my liking. I can understand that it's difficult to create factual notes for such fantastical I got this book largely because I felt it was time I had an Andersen collection, and figured the annotations couldn't hurt. While this is a decent group of his stories, gathering the obvious with the less so and dividing them with little regard into Stories for Children and Stories for Adults, I can't say I enjoyed Maria Tatar's notes. My main beef with the annotations is that they're far too analytic for my liking. I can understand that it's difficult to create factual notes for such fantastical stories (as Gardner did so marvelously for The Annotated Alice, still best in the series), I don't know that it was necessary to fill the gap with critical, philosophical and feminist views that are often either too obvious or too much a stretch. Added to this, I don't care for Tatar's writing, and when some of the annotations out-length the stories, this gets to be a problem. She's a scholar, clearly, and her writing smacks of too many hours spent trying to gain entry to academic journals. Her brief Andersen biography is good evidence of this, frequently sliding into critique of the biographies she uses as reference rather than having just done the work to give a straight-forward life-of-Andersen. Tatar states plainly at the start of the book that she had reservations about doing this book, and I wish she'd listened to them. I would have preferred someone who's more invested in the works and in Andersen to have done it, even if it meant pandering to the fiction of Andersen himself (who, it turns out, was really not a very likeable fellow, so I can understand fans of his preferring his friend-to-children-everywhere image instead). Beyond the notes, there are plenty of lovely illustrations. Sadly, they are often poorly reproduced, and just as often poorly placed in the story (coming before or after the depicted events, kind of spoiling the effect). The better bits of this edition are the artist biographies, the quotes from famous (and not so) people about Andersen, and of course, the stories themselves. If you're looking for a collection of Andersen stories, I'd advise getting one with more stories or illustrations you love, rather than bothering with this one.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Another edition in Tatar's annotated fairy tale series. This edition includes well known tales, such as "The Little Mermaid", as well as stories for adults. It is well illustrated and includes a section at the end where authors give thier thoughts on Andersen. While not intended solely for children, the book's illustrations make it child friendly, while the annotations make it attractive for adults.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jen (Jen & Mel's Book Nook)

    I really liked reading this collection of Hans Christian Andersen’s stories, especially since some of my favourite childhood stories were contained in this book. I had previously read a collection of the Brothers Grimm fairy tales with annotations also by Maria Tatar and I have to say that I did not enjoy the annotations this time around. They were very lengthy and were much more in depth than I wanted. I actually ended up skimming or skipping over the annotations entirely and just read the I really liked reading this collection of Hans Christian Andersen’s stories, especially since some of my favourite childhood stories were contained in this book. I had previously read a collection of the Brothers Grimm fairy tales with annotations also by Maria Tatar and I have to say that I did not enjoy the annotations this time around. They were very lengthy and were much more in depth than I wanted. I actually ended up skimming or skipping over the annotations entirely and just read the stories themselves.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    I am a life long reader and lover of Hans Christian Andersen. This annotated version does justice to the magic and power and despair of his stories. Maria Tatar's insights and bibliographical information adds a nice intellectual context to the stories. Andersen wrote 157 fairy tales so the 24 stories is just a smattering of his work, but it has all the classic ones: "The Little Mermaid," (my personal favorite) "The Emperor's New Clothes," "The Wild Swans," "Thumbelina," "The Princess and the I am a life long reader and lover of Hans Christian Andersen. This annotated version does justice to the magic and power and despair of his stories. Maria Tatar's insights and bibliographical information adds a nice intellectual context to the stories. Andersen wrote 157 fairy tales so the 24 stories is just a smattering of his work, but it has all the classic ones: "The Little Mermaid," (my personal favorite) "The Emperor's New Clothes," "The Wild Swans," "Thumbelina," "The Princess and the Pea," "The Snow Queen," "The Ugly Duckling," etc. There is a wide range of his works. He has his charming fairy tales with the happy endings, he has the absurdly violent punishment stories, and the existential crises stories. I recommend this to anyone who loves Andersen, or is just gettting to know him. My one complaint is that Maria Tatar confesses in her introduction to not always liking Andersen. It doesn't show in the annotations, but it comes back in the biography of him at the end of the book. I felt like she wrote negatively of him. As is she reveled in calling him "narcissitic" and "childlike." It is acceptable to me to like the art without liking the artist, but I felt in a book that is dedicated to the man as much as to his work, the biography could have been written in a different tone. A neat part at the end of the book are excerpts from famous people who were moved by Andersen's tales. I enjoyed reading them. Especially the one about Frank Lloyd Wright.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    Whether you're a fan of Hans Christian Andersen, or whether you find his tales moralistic and depressing, it's hard to deny the impact he's had on modern culture and fantasy. This is a beautifully designed volume; the annotations are marginal, so there's no flipping back and forth, and they provide a lot of insight into the background of the stories. The volume is gorgeously illustrated with reproductions of the illustrations that originally accompanied the various stories. There's also Whether you're a fan of Hans Christian Andersen, or whether you find his tales moralistic and depressing, it's hard to deny the impact he's had on modern culture and fantasy. This is a beautifully designed volume; the annotations are marginal, so there's no flipping back and forth, and they provide a lot of insight into the background of the stories. The volume is gorgeously illustrated with reproductions of the illustrations that originally accompanied the various stories. There's also biographical information about Andersen, as well as short biographical sketches of the artists who most famously illustrated his works.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I'm just skimming this, looking at all the pictures and reading notes and bits that capture my interest. The thing that I find fascinating is that illustrated adaptations of the man's work are so popular. The thing that Tatar finds best about his work are his words and stylings. Note the dissonance.... I did find enlightening the appendix of comments by adults about their reactions to Andersen's works. Everyone from Alcott to Herman Hesse to Dickens has something specific to say in the appendix I'm just skimming this, looking at all the pictures and reading notes and bits that capture my interest. The thing that I find fascinating is that illustrated adaptations of the man's work are so popular. The thing that Tatar finds best about his work are his words and stylings. Note the dissonance.... I did find enlightening the appendix of comments by adults about their reactions to Andersen's works. Everyone from Alcott to Herman Hesse to Dickens has something specific to say in the appendix "Andersen's Readers." I wish that more examples of adaptations were given. For example, The Snow Queen was borrowed for Narnia, and is also adapted brilliantly in The Raven and the Reindeer and Breadcrumbs. The first example of an adaptation of The Princess and the Pea that comes to mind is a funny picturebook, The Very Smart Pea and the Princess-to-be by Mini Grey. I could list more, and so could you. What makes them so special? And a related question, why don't more ppl go back and read the originals? The ones that I did scan here are indeed beautifully written... up until the end, which is often a rather heavy-handed moral. I recommend that you-all do read the originals. And think about them. And think about the adaptations that you share with your children. And consider sharing some of the originals with your children. They are widely avl. free online. Some are much longer than one would expect, and there are others that many of us have never heard of. It's all very interesting.... Ah, here's more. Tatar makes a distinction between tales for children and tales for adults. The only children's tale that I didn't know is Jagten på Ole Lukøje (Ole Shuteye) (which is too long for me to read right now but is avl here: http://hca.gilead.org.il/ole_luk.html) as titled: Ole-Luk-Oie, The Dream God. Also translated as "sandman" though Andersen substitutes milk. The Red Shoes has a child protagonist and is published as a children's book. I'm not sure why Tatar lists it with the adult tales, unless it's because so many adults with feminist perspectives have used it in their works. Most of the other stories in this section are too abstractly metaphorical for children, with mature and even truly horrifying subject matter. But 'The Most Astonishing Thing' and 'The Goblin and the Grocer' are interesting little reads. Anyway, I'm done now. I skipped the biography, though it is true that Andersen's life most definitely informed his work. If you can see a copy of this at your library or university, it's worth a look... but the best advice I give you is indeed to read the stories carefully yourself.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ilib4kids

    839.8136 AND There are a lot annotation in this book. Hans Christian Andersen was a Danish April 2, 1805 - August 4, 1875 安徒生. This Anderson's version of little Mermaid is different from Disney Movie. I started reading fairy tales after reading Peggy's book. Orenstein, Peggy 's Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Frontlines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture, in chapter Six Guns and Briar Roses, talking about violent play and gruesomeness of old fairy tales in child's development. and also 839.8136 AND There are a lot annotation in this book. Hans Christian Andersen was a Danish April 2, 1805 - August 4, 1875 安徒生. This Anderson's version of little Mermaid is different from Disney Movie. I started reading fairy tales after reading Peggy's book. Orenstein, Peggy 's Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Frontlines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture, in chapter Six Guns and Briar Roses, talking about violent play and gruesomeness of old fairy tales in child's development. and also Here is excerpt from the book. The thing is, though, if you believe the psychologist Bruno Bettelheim, we avoid the Grimms' grimness at our peril. His classic book The Uses of Enchantment argues that the brothers' gore is not only central to the tales appeal, it's crucial to kids' emotional development. (An earlier intellectual rock star, John Locke, disagreed; he deemed the fairy tales too gruesome for little ears, but then again, he also thought the offspring of the poor should be put to work at age three.) According to Bettelheim, fairy tales and only fairy tales as -opposed to myths or legends-tap into children's unconscious preoccupations with such knotty issues as sibling rivalry or the fear of omnivorous mother. In their tiny minds, a fearsome giant transformed into the school bully, a menacing wolf into a neighbor’s pit bull. Fairy tales demonstrate that hardship may be inevitable, but those who stand fast emerge victorious. What's more, he wrote, the solutions to life's struggles that fairy tales suggest are subtle, impressionistic, and therefore more useful than either the spoon-fed pap that passes for kiddie "literature" these days or the overly concrete images of television (and now the Internet). He goes so far as to say that without exposure to fairy tales a child will be unable to create a meaningful life. Andersen's fairy tales include: The Angel (1843) The Bell The Emperor's New Clothes (1837) The Fir-Tree (1844) The Galoshes of Fortune (1838) The Happy Family The Ice-Maiden (1863) It's Quite True! Later Tales, published during 1867 & 1868 (1869) The Little Match Girl (1845) The Little Mermaid (1837) Little Tuck The Most Incredible Thing (1870) The Nightingale (1843) The Old House The Philosopher's Stone (1859) The Princess and the Pea (1835) The Red Shoes (1845) Sandman (1841) The Shadow (1847) The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep (1845) The Snow Queen (1844) The Steadfast Tin Soldier (1838) The Story of a Mother (1847) The Swineherd (1841) Thumbelina (1835) The Tinderbox (1835) The Ugly Duckling (1843) The Wild Swans (1838)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Read this as bedtime stories for Jr as a follow-up to Grimm fairy tales. Interesting to see some of the parallels in characters and storylines. Lots of great stories in this one, including some where it was cool to hear the "original version" and compare to Disney-fied versions (e.g., Little Mermaid), and also plenty of other stories I had never heard before that were very entertaining. Big hit with Jr! The illustrations in this version are pretty awesome, and I like having the annotations too.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Phoebe Marie

    4.5 stars Reading Andersen is like never having to wake from a dream.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Antonio Filipe

    Outstanding, breath-taking!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    I had forgotten just how viscerally terrifying "The Red Shoes" and "The Girl Who Trod on a Loaf" were.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lynley

    Astounded by the number of reviews complaining that Tatar's wonderful annotations get in the way of this expensive annotated collection. Especially when you can read these public domain fairytales online -- annotation free -- anytime, at no expense.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Danelle

    The Annotated Hans Christian Andersen is a beefy volume edited by Maria Tartar. Over 400 pages of HCA's stories with accompanying illustrations from over time it includes a plethora of notes on nearly everything in each story. The book is divided into parts. Part I being, 'Tales For Children' includes: The Emperor's New Clothes, The Snow Queen, The Princess and the Pea, The Nightingale, The Ugly Duckling, The Little Mermaid, The Tinderbox, The Wild Swans, Thumbelina, The Little Match Girl, The The Annotated Hans Christian Andersen is a beefy volume edited by Maria Tartar. Over 400 pages of HCA's stories with accompanying illustrations from over time it includes a plethora of notes on nearly everything in each story. The book is divided into parts. Part I being, 'Tales For Children' includes: The Emperor's New Clothes, The Snow Queen, The Princess and the Pea, The Nightingale, The Ugly Duckling, The Little Mermaid, The Tinderbox, The Wild Swans, Thumbelina, The Little Match Girl, The Steadfast Tin Soldier, and Ole Shut-Eye. Part II is 'Tales For Adults' and contains: The Red Shoes, The Shadow, The Psyche, The Most Astonishing Thing, The Story of a Mother, The Girl Who Trod on the Loaf, The Phoenix, The Goblin and the Grocer, Auntie Toothache, The Flying Trunk, Heartache, and The Bell. Part III contains a biography of HCA and notes on the illustrators of the works included. The illustrations are varied and come from publications of the stories over time (watercolors, ink, etc.) and are reason enough to purchase this book. They are wonderful. Part IV, 'Andersen's Readers' is a smattering of thoughts on HCA's stories by others, including Charles Dickens, Henry James, Vincent Van Gogh, Louisa May Alcott, and A.S. Byatt. I'd either forgotten or didn't realize as a child what a religious bent HCA's stories had. A fan of fairy tales in general, I enjoyed rereading the ones I was familiar with and discovering those I'd never read before. (Though I prefer the stories of the Brothers Grimm overall.) The annotations were helpful, at times. I read them when I absolutely wanted to know something.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jenny T

    I'm so glad I picked this up. Alongside a very readable translation of some of the original tales (divided into Stories for Children and Stories for Adults), Maria Tatar presents a wealth of comments and criticism from all sorts of scholars, writers, and folklorists, in addition to social commentary and historical tidbits. My reading list has grown significantly. My favorite stories: The Shadow, The Wild Swans, Ole Shut-Eye. The Red Shoes was ghastly. Also, I wasn't aware how many religious I'm so glad I picked this up. Alongside a very readable translation of some of the original tales (divided into Stories for Children and Stories for Adults), Maria Tatar presents a wealth of comments and criticism from all sorts of scholars, writers, and folklorists, in addition to social commentary and historical tidbits. My reading list has grown significantly. My favorite stories: The Shadow, The Wild Swans, Ole Shut-Eye. The Red Shoes was ghastly. Also, I wasn't aware how many religious undertones there were in Andersen's stories. I learned so much. I learned that Andersen's short story "The Most Astonishing Thing" was reprinted in 1942 by a group of scholars that would soon become leaders of the Danish resistance during World War II. I learned that the Finnish word for the Aurora Borealis is "revontulet," meaning "fox fires," because according the Finnish folklore, the lights are created by Arctic foxes brushing their tails against the snow. And I learned that Anderson *really* did not like children. ALSO, the tales are presented with artists' representations of them through the decades. Beautiful illustrations, and very, very cool.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Therese

    A beautiful annotated edition of the fairy tales containing twelve of Andersen's most popular stories for children plus twelve more stories for adults. Includes "The Little Mermaid," "The Little Match-Girl," "The Ugly Duckling," "The Princess and the Pea," and "The Snow Queen," among others. There are also many classic, wonderful illustrations from past editions (including a lot of Arthur Rackham and Edmund Dulac, two of my favorites). The annotations are very informative and readable, not dry A beautiful annotated edition of the fairy tales containing twelve of Andersen's most popular stories for children plus twelve more stories for adults. Includes "The Little Mermaid," "The Little Match-Girl," "The Ugly Duckling," "The Princess and the Pea," and "The Snow Queen," among others. There are also many classic, wonderful illustrations from past editions (including a lot of Arthur Rackham and Edmund Dulac, two of my favorites). The annotations are very informative and readable, not dry or scholarly. The introduction, biographical section, and the section on others' perceptions of Andersen, likewise make for very easy, interesting reading. This is a good edition either for reading aloud to a child or as a starting point for the general reader wanting to delve a little more deeply into Andersen. It doesn't go into scholarly depth, but offers a wealth of suggestions and ideas for further research.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Holly Lindquist

    Andersen’s fairy tales are beautiful but disturbing, like the bright flash of a silvery blade in the moonlight. There’s always that sharp edge lurking just under the surface, like the little boy who discovers an infinite coldness on the other side of the windowpane. Or the girl dancing through the countryside in bloody shoes. Or the child of the sea who sacrifices everything for a love that can never be hers. Truly happy endings are sometimes rare in the world of fairy tales, but in Andersen’s Andersen’s fairy tales are beautiful but disturbing, like the bright flash of a silvery blade in the moonlight. There’s always that sharp edge lurking just under the surface, like the little boy who discovers an infinite coldness on the other side of the windowpane. Or the girl dancing through the countryside in bloody shoes. Or the child of the sea who sacrifices everything for a love that can never be hers. Truly happy endings are sometimes rare in the world of fairy tales, but in Andersen’s case they’re as rare as an honest politician. It’s easy to forgive that dark tendency of his though, because Andersen’s a consummate storyteller and his work is wonderfully show-cased in Maria Tatar’s annotated edition. Definitely worth getting your hands on a copy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Read it to remember the more popular stories you might have heard when you were young -- "The Steadfast Tin Soldier," "The Ugly Duckling," "The Red Shoes," "The Little Match Girl." Then read the rest of the stories, particularly the "Tales for Adults," and become uncomfortably aware of how palpably desperate the underpinnings of this man's strange and convoluted writing life really were. With this edition, I was surprised to find the annotations rather unilluminating, compared to, say, those in Read it to remember the more popular stories you might have heard when you were young -- "The Steadfast Tin Soldier," "The Ugly Duckling," "The Red Shoes," "The Little Match Girl." Then read the rest of the stories, particularly the "Tales for Adults," and become uncomfortably aware of how palpably desperate the underpinnings of this man's strange and convoluted writing life really were. With this edition, I was surprised to find the annotations rather unilluminating, compared to, say, those in The Annotated Grimms Fairy Tales. More summary than substance, with a very occasional biographical anecdote of interest. Beautiful cover and illustrations, however, as is true for all the Annotateds.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    Most of Andersen's tails are tragic and disturbing. Not as disgusting as Grimm's fairy tales, though. I didn't know much about the man before I read this collection (he was nothing like Danny Kaye), but it seems that many of his stories are based on his own life. Characters are often isolated, ignored, suffering or talented. A theme of Christian salvation is prominent in many stories. I didn't enjoy all of the stories in the book, but some, including The Emperor's New Clothes, The Ugly Duckling Most of Andersen's tails are tragic and disturbing. Not as disgusting as Grimm's fairy tales, though. I didn't know much about the man before I read this collection (he was nothing like Danny Kaye), but it seems that many of his stories are based on his own life. Characters are often isolated, ignored, suffering or talented. A theme of Christian salvation is prominent in many stories. I didn't enjoy all of the stories in the book, but some, including The Emperor's New Clothes, The Ugly Duckling and The Nightingale, are superb.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Siskiyou-Suzy

    For a while, I was a big fan of Hans Christian Andersen. I have this book in addition to a complete collection of his stories. I've always loved fairy tales (which is almost like saying I've always loved puppies -- yeah, most people do!), and as I got older, I found them more and more interesting. But now I can see that they don't really hold up -- it's not that the stories themselves don't always hold up (though many don't). But none of them are written in a style I enjoy; the flightiness of the For a while, I was a big fan of Hans Christian Andersen. I have this book in addition to a complete collection of his stories. I've always loved fairy tales (which is almost like saying I've always loved puppies -- yeah, most people do!), and as I got older, I found them more and more interesting. But now I can see that they don't really hold up -- it's not that the stories themselves don't always hold up (though many don't). But none of them are written in a style I enjoy; the flightiness of the narrative

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kerith

    For fairy tale fans this is a must have, along with the Grimm's. Andersen was definitely more prolific and many of his tales are not in here but Maria Tatar does include the most famous (Snow Queen, Little Mermaid, etc) along with some lesser known stories that I had never seen. As usual, a gorgeously packaged read from WW Norton. I love collecting these, and the annotations add a new level to a reading of tales we think we remember.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Krista

    OK, I admit, I didn't read the whole thing, just the stories I liked as a kid. The notations were wonderful; they added a new dimension to old favorites for me. I kept thinking about Bruno Bettelheim's "The Uses of Enchantment" while reading this, and would have enjoyed seeing more psychological perspectives in the notations.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Liz Thoth

    The stories that were picked out for the book summed up Anderson's work as a whole. Some other references seemed to me almost too much like they had subliminal meanings, when in fact Andersen could have not have always had a meaning behind every small scene in the children's stories.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dr.

    Must read literature. Highly recommend this version. Worth every penny due to the notes and insights. Particularly enjoyable to read to children. Little Match Stick Girl - My favorite short story.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    the craftsmanship of an entertaining plot line for tales has gone a long way since Hans Christian Andersen was making Giotto-esk strides in storytelling. Not that entertaining to read... got the book for $2 at Mardens.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Heather Browning

    Such a gorgeous book. I love the slightly desolate feel of Andersen's fairy tales, and this book accompanied them with great annotations on the stories' meaning and context, as well as beautiful illustrations.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bettina

    the annotated edition is excellent. worth buying.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Adams

    Didnt realize H. C. Anderson was SO anti-semetic O_o Otherwise pretty good...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

    I love this entire series of annotated books.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    im only reading The Little Mermaid

  30. 5 out of 5

    Krystal

    You can't really go wrong with a classic.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.