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The Southern Foodways Alliance Community Cookbook

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Everybody has one in their collection. You know—one of those old, spiral- or plastic-tooth-bound cookbooks sold to support a high school marching band, a church, or the local chapter of the Junior League. These recipe collections reflect, with unimpeachable authenticity, the dishes that define communities: chicken and dumplings, macaroni and cheese, chess pie. When the Everybody has one in their collection. You know—one of those old, spiral- or plastic-tooth-bound cookbooks sold to support a high school marching band, a church, or the local chapter of the Junior League. These recipe collections reflect, with unimpeachable authenticity, the dishes that define communities: chicken and dumplings, macaroni and cheese, chess pie. When the Southern Foodways Alliance began curating a cookbook, it was to these spiral-bound, sauce-splattered pages that they turned for their model. Including more than 170 tested recipes, this cookbook is a true reflection of southern foodways and the people, regardless of residence or birthplace, who claim this food as their own. Traditional and adapted, fancy and unapologetically plain, these recipes are powerful expressions of collective identity. There is something from—and something for—everyone. The recipes and the stories that accompany them came from academics, writers, catfish farmers, ham curers, attorneys, toqued chefs, and people who just like to cook—spiritual Southerners of myriad ethnicities, origins, and culinary skill levels. Edited by Sara Roahen and John T. Edge, written, collaboratively, by Sheri Castle, Timothy C. Davis, April McGreger, Angie Mosier, and Fred Sauceman, the book is divided into chapters that represent the region’s iconic foods: Gravy, Garden Goods, Roots, Greens, Rice, Grist, Yardbird, Pig, The Hook, The Hunt, Put Up, and Cane. Therein you’ll find recipes for pimento cheese, country ham with redeye gravy, tomato pie, oyster stew, gumbo z’herbes, and apple stack cake. You’ll learn traditional ways of preserving green beans, and you’ll come to love refried black-eyed peas. Are you hungry yet? Published in association with the Southern Foodways Alliance at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi. A Friends Fund Publication.


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Everybody has one in their collection. You know—one of those old, spiral- or plastic-tooth-bound cookbooks sold to support a high school marching band, a church, or the local chapter of the Junior League. These recipe collections reflect, with unimpeachable authenticity, the dishes that define communities: chicken and dumplings, macaroni and cheese, chess pie. When the Everybody has one in their collection. You know—one of those old, spiral- or plastic-tooth-bound cookbooks sold to support a high school marching band, a church, or the local chapter of the Junior League. These recipe collections reflect, with unimpeachable authenticity, the dishes that define communities: chicken and dumplings, macaroni and cheese, chess pie. When the Southern Foodways Alliance began curating a cookbook, it was to these spiral-bound, sauce-splattered pages that they turned for their model. Including more than 170 tested recipes, this cookbook is a true reflection of southern foodways and the people, regardless of residence or birthplace, who claim this food as their own. Traditional and adapted, fancy and unapologetically plain, these recipes are powerful expressions of collective identity. There is something from—and something for—everyone. The recipes and the stories that accompany them came from academics, writers, catfish farmers, ham curers, attorneys, toqued chefs, and people who just like to cook—spiritual Southerners of myriad ethnicities, origins, and culinary skill levels. Edited by Sara Roahen and John T. Edge, written, collaboratively, by Sheri Castle, Timothy C. Davis, April McGreger, Angie Mosier, and Fred Sauceman, the book is divided into chapters that represent the region’s iconic foods: Gravy, Garden Goods, Roots, Greens, Rice, Grist, Yardbird, Pig, The Hook, The Hunt, Put Up, and Cane. Therein you’ll find recipes for pimento cheese, country ham with redeye gravy, tomato pie, oyster stew, gumbo z’herbes, and apple stack cake. You’ll learn traditional ways of preserving green beans, and you’ll come to love refried black-eyed peas. Are you hungry yet? Published in association with the Southern Foodways Alliance at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi. A Friends Fund Publication.

30 review for The Southern Foodways Alliance Community Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dixie Diamond

    I really like this. If you're a stickler for uniqueness in a cookbook, move on. This is a collection of common, representative, recipes by intention. My only gripe is that I'd have liked more depth. It's not meant to be a history on par with Robb Walsh's Tex-Mex Cookbook, but it could have come closer. The personal stories are nice but they're mere paragraphs. More background and historical substance might have served the subject better. On the up side: It looks really good next to my Fiesta I really like this. If you're a stickler for uniqueness in a cookbook, move on. This is a collection of common, representative, recipes by intention. My only gripe is that I'd have liked more depth. It's not meant to be a history on par with Robb Walsh's Tex-Mex Cookbook, but it could have come closer. The personal stories are nice but they're mere paragraphs. More background and historical substance might have served the subject better. On the up side: It looks really good next to my Fiesta dishes.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Julie Davis

    Quintessential Southern community cookbook recipes, selected and edited by those who care passionately about Southern food and culture. The recipes are all fairly simple, the headnotes and section introductions are interesting, and if you like Southern cooking there is no need to look further.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    If you have a large collection of southern cookbooks, these recipes are not unique, but good for someone just beginning to learn about this area.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Isadora Wagner

    Part of my culinary reading. A good find from Mississippi. Authentic recipes.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

    I'm a sucker for bone fide community cookbooks, and this one is the best I've ever seen!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Grace

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  8. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Kaleck

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joanna Mathias

  11. 4 out of 5

    EVELYN M. LARRIMORE

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bill Kte'pi

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mark Mckelroy

  14. 4 out of 5

    Noreen

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Grigsby

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Nobles

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gary Heaton

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lori

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ren LeVally

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chad Allan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  29. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

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