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Doctor Who Classics Omnibus, Vol. 1

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Featuring work from some of the most prominent names in comics including Dave Gibbons and Grant Morrison, follow along as the Doctor plays out his classic tales, all featuring state-of-the-art coloring by Charlie Kirchoff. Stories collected include "City of the Damned," "Dreamers of Death," "Iron Legion," "Spider-God," "Changes," and more!


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Featuring work from some of the most prominent names in comics including Dave Gibbons and Grant Morrison, follow along as the Doctor plays out his classic tales, all featuring state-of-the-art coloring by Charlie Kirchoff. Stories collected include "City of the Damned," "Dreamers of Death," "Iron Legion," "Spider-God," "Changes," and more!

30 review for Doctor Who Classics Omnibus, Vol. 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mary Jo

    This was an interesting compilation of several stories from the Doctor Who Classics comic series. Most of the stories follow the Fourth Doctor, though there are a few stories with the Sixth Doctor, Peri & Frobisher and one with the Seventh Doctor. Like the tie-in novels from a few years ago and the Big Finish audios, these stories extend the reigns of these classic Doctors. Definitely a must read for any classic Doctor Who fan!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    The Doctor hangs out with a shapeshifting alien penguin? Yes, please.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    This book collects nearly 350 pages of comics from Doctor Who Magazine, mostly starring the Fourth Doctor but with two sixth Doctor strips and a seventh Doctor strip thrown in. The comics were originally in black and white but are colorized beautifully in this collection. The book begins with "The Iron Legion," the first Doctor Who comic story to appear in Doctor Who Magazine. In many ways, it had hallmarks of the previous TV comics strip that many Doctor Who stories appeared in previous with a This book collects nearly 350 pages of comics from Doctor Who Magazine, mostly starring the Fourth Doctor but with two sixth Doctor strips and a seventh Doctor strip thrown in. The comics were originally in black and white but are colorized beautifully in this collection. The book begins with "The Iron Legion," the first Doctor Who comic story to appear in Doctor Who Magazine. In many ways, it had hallmarks of the previous TV comics strip that many Doctor Who stories appeared in previous with a companionless Doctor travelling into danger. However, this story of a Roman Empire in space is simply fantastic with so many great twists and turns. It's fast paced given the demand of weekly publication that there be some dramatic moment every four to six pages. The City of the Damned into a city where emotion is a crime and the Doctor is set to have his emotions extracted. He's rescued by a ragtag group age of rebels who have a problem of their own, they can feel emotions but they can only each feel one. The story has some serious points but also some incredibly light touches with a great ending. Time Slip is an eight page comic that creates an excuse for the Doctor to change back to his prior regenerations. With only four, it's a lot less impressive than stories involving ten or eleven. This story is noteworthy for featuring Canine. Doctor Who and the Star Beast introduces the twisted evil of a very cute looking character called, "The Meep" and also gives the Doctor his first DWM Companion in Sharon, an English teenager. Doctor Who and the Dogs of Doom features the Doctor battling Werelocks, a sort of Werewolf style creature and one of the Doctor's oldest enemies. Doctor Who and the Time Witch has the Doctor and Sharon pulled into a pocket dimension controlled by the Titular Time Witch. This is an okay story but Sharon ages forward four years and is sort of non-plussed about the whole thing. The Dragon's Claw plays off the popularity of martial arts films in the late 1970s and we meet yet another old foe in a believable and exciting story. The Collector is a story reminiscent of War Games with someone kidnapping people from history. The ending is a bit of copout as it involves the Doctor travelling through his own timestream for a very weak the time stream for a very weak reason. It's the type of plot device that could be overused to solve every problem the Doctor faces. The Dreamer of Death is a sort of a precursor to 1990s tales warning of Virtual Reality machines. It marks Sharon's unceremonious departure marry random person, reminiscent of how Leela left the TV series. Then we get three Grant Morrison stories from the mid-1980s. "Changes" is an amusing but predictable tale of the Sixth Doctor, Peri, and Frobisher encountering another shapeshifter in the TARDIS. The story is fun but predictable. The Seventh Doctor talks to a cell culture and seeds a planet with life in, "Culture Shock."d The Sixth Doctor reunites with Jamie in a mystery involving a dead Time Lord in a story that's interesting but with a sort of cynical edge that John Byrne brought to American comics with Man of Steel. The Fourth Doctor Comics resume after this but with less of a Doctor Who feel and more of a genery. ral science fiction story, perhaps to match John Nathan Turner coming to helm Doctor Who on TV. The Doctor meets Promethus and explores Greek mythology in, "The Life Bringer." in "War of the Words," the Doctor finds a clever way to stop a war. In, "Spider-God," the Doctor doesn't really anything but lecture humans for doing something foolish. In, "The Deal," ia criminal hijacks his way on to the TARDIS. In, the "End of the Line," The Doctor lands in a post-apocalyptic city and has an adventure with a very depressing ending. In, "The Free-Fall Warriors," the Doctor gets involved in a space race in a limited plot episode where the Doctor mostly takes backseat. Overall, I thought the first 60% of the book was simply smashing with the early adventures of the Fourth Doctor in Doctor Who Magazine which told stories that were good and which worked great in the comic format (looking even better colorized). The rest of the book is okay, but just okay as we get some interesting stories, but many of them are also pretentious or don't really fit into the world of Doctor Who. So, it's a mixed bag but much more good than bad.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    This book collects the comics from the first 57 issues of the Doctor Who Magazine, originally published between 1979 and 1981 [1]. For reasons unknown, a few later strips are also inserted, seemingly at random. The comics star the then-current TV Doctor, as played by Tom Baker, though he usually bears only a passing resemblance to his TV persona. He has the big grin and laughing eyes, but the contrasting gravitas that was a key aspect of the character is largely missing. A notable exception is This book collects the comics from the first 57 issues of the Doctor Who Magazine, originally published between 1979 and 1981 [1]. For reasons unknown, a few later strips are also inserted, seemingly at random. The comics star the then-current TV Doctor, as played by Tom Baker, though he usually bears only a passing resemblance to his TV persona. He has the big grin and laughing eyes, but the contrasting gravitas that was a key aspect of the character is largely missing. A notable exception is 'End of the Line', where the Doctor encounters the handful of survivors of a collapsed civilisation that must once have resembled our own--it's a story that out-bleaks even the bleakest of season 18's episodes. For the most part he's the wide-eyed fun-loving eccentric that he was only occasionally, but memorably, on TV. I never paid much attention to the DWM comics when I regularly read the magazine in the late 80s and the 90s. Mostly I'd skip them. Not a big fan of comics in those days. The great exception was the issue that introduced Frobisher, in the first issue I bought, in 1984. Despite being only a few pages long, that instalment was plainly vastly superior to anything we'd seen on TV in years. But that's a review for another time. The comics collected in this book are aimed at a fairly youthful audience, and occasionally this jars for an adult fan. But I was mainly impressed with their breadth of imagination, and their ability to do things the TV show couldn't. There's a sense that this Doctor inhabits a boundless, richly imagined science fiction universe, peopled by a wide range of intelligent aliens who are just people, not monsters. The makers of the TV series might have loved to evoke the same sense of cosmic diversity, but budget limitations prevented it. The Doctor's companion in many of the strips is Sharon, a black teenager from an industrial town in England, through whom the comic crosses barriers of class, race and geography that the 20th century version of the TV series seldom or never did. After several adventures with the Doctor, a time-accident ages Sharon to adulthood in an instant. Possibly the editors wanted to start giving her sexier outfits. Possibly they just enjoyed the thrill of transforming a character in a way that would be impossible on TV. The Doctor's robot dog K9 is also present, no doubt because the publisher didn't have to pay an actor for the use of his likeness. He vanishes without explanation around the same time he left the TV series. None of the other TV characters gets a mention (except in the handful of much later strips that are unaccountably included). It's refreshing that no attempt is made to reconcile any of these comics with the TV show, or to say which episodes they're supposed to be set between, even while the Doctor's outfit evolves in parallel with the TV version. These comics were originally published in monochrome, and have been coloured for this book. Ordinarily I'm a stickler for things being republished in their original form, but the colouring is good enough that I could easily forgive it. [1] Yes, I know it was called Doctor Who Weekly and Doctor Who Monthly in those days, but such pedant-appeasing detail would break up the flow of my opening sentence.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    "Time Slip" is probably the most Doctor Who story line in the collection (and also the best and worth reading through). I had some of these books from the first time they went around, and they plucked the nostalgia strings, albeit not deftly. They are interesting science fiction comic books, but they're not particularly Doctor Who comic books. I think I've seen some similar stories in other scifi comics. Wasn't there a terrible Star Trek comic book pitting the crew of the Enterprise against "Time Slip" is probably the most Doctor Who story line in the collection (and also the best and worth reading through). I had some of these books from the first time they went around, and they plucked the nostalgia strings, albeit not deftly. They are interesting science fiction comic books, but they're not particularly Doctor Who comic books. I think I've seen some similar stories in other scifi comics. Wasn't there a terrible Star Trek comic book pitting the crew of the Enterprise against Greek gods? Has the Doctor really been this violent all along but deflects the violence through a surrogate? I know it's been a trend, but in this collection it seems to be a constant theme.

  6. 5 out of 5

    C E

    This is the first volume of these classics. Most of them are very entertaining Who stories. For the most part, its Baker's Doctor that you follow, so don't expect this to be like Tennant's or Smith's. Much less darkness. Sometimes, it seems like the Doctor can only save the world through pure silliness. But that makes most of these short tales a good summer read. Looking forward to volume 2, but I wouldn't necessarily recommend this. You should already be a Who fan if you are going to read this.

  7. 5 out of 5

    John

    This book is an omnibus version of the Doctor Who Classics comics published by IDW. Most of the stories contain the 4th Doctor, while a couple contain the 6th and 7th Doctors. If you read this then chances are you are already a fan of Doctor Who and comics, so there is a good chance that you will like this. Since this is an omnibus, the collection varies in the quality of the stories but overall they are fun to read. In many cases it is clear why these are short stories adapted for comics This book is an omnibus version of the Doctor Who Classics comics published by IDW. Most of the stories contain the 4th Doctor, while a couple contain the 6th and 7th Doctors. If you read this then chances are you are already a fan of Doctor Who and comics, so there is a good chance that you will like this. Since this is an omnibus, the collection varies in the quality of the stories but overall they are fun to read. In many cases it is clear why these are short stories adapted for comics instead of some other medium. Overall, this book is a fun, light read for Doctor Who fans.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Most of these are interesting stories, but not necessarily good *Doctor Who* stories. Nonetheless, taken together they form an interesting, at times compelling narrative. The exception are the Grant Morrison stories, which are all very good. The World Shapers is superb, with its careful attention to continuity (though I find IDW's constantly jumping around in continuity when they *could* have printed everything in order up to at least the 7th Doctor, to be very annoying).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nazary

    It's a bit of a slog at times but it's a pretty good read overall, especially for a Doctor Who fan. It's interesting to see how different writers and artists tackle the same subject matter. This volume even includes a Grant Morrison story, which is exactly as loopy as it sounds like.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jon Snow

    Very funny and clever stories in here. Very enjoyable read especially if you're a doctor who fan.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lawrence

    http://gnomeship.blogspot.com/2013/04...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Terrible writing. Terrible.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Danny

    Definitely worth checking out if you're into Doctor Who! My favorite stories were: Doctor Who and the Star Beast, Changes, and Culture Shock.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina Reiger

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dane Wagner

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jason Curtin

  19. 4 out of 5

    Yourboyleroy

  20. 5 out of 5

    Derek Newman-Stille

  21. 4 out of 5

    The Master

  22. 4 out of 5

    Catelin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mike McDevitt

  24. 4 out of 5

    Davidg

  25. 4 out of 5

    David Haddon

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Hartman

  27. 5 out of 5

    retnolaras

  28. 4 out of 5

    Filipe

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Vangenderen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

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