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Love Lettering

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In this warm and witty romance from acclaimed author Kate Clayborn, one little word puts one woman’s business—and her heart—in jeopardy . . . Meg Mackworth’s hand-lettering skill has made her famous as the Planner of Park Slope, designing beautiful custom journals for New York City’s elite. She has another skill too: reading signs that other people miss. Like the time she In this warm and witty romance from acclaimed author Kate Clayborn, one little word puts one woman’s business—and her heart—in jeopardy . . . Meg Mackworth’s hand-lettering skill has made her famous as the Planner of Park Slope, designing beautiful custom journals for New York City’s elite. She has another skill too: reading signs that other people miss. Like the time she sat across from Reid Sutherland and his gorgeous fiancée, and knew their upcoming marriage was doomed to fail. Weaving a secret word into their wedding program was a little unprofessional, but she was sure no one else would spot it. She hadn’t counted on sharp-eyed, pattern-obsessed Reid . . . A year later, Reid has tracked Meg down to find out—before he leaves New York for good—how she knew that his meticulously planned future was about to implode. But with a looming deadline, a fractured friendship, and a bad case of creative block, Meg doesn’t have time for Reid’s questions—unless he can help her find her missing inspiration. As they gradually open up to each other about their lives, work, and regrets, both try to ignore the fact that their unlikely connection is growing deeper. But the signs are there—irresistible, indisputable, urging Meg to heed the messages Reid is sending her, before it’s too late . . .


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In this warm and witty romance from acclaimed author Kate Clayborn, one little word puts one woman’s business—and her heart—in jeopardy . . . Meg Mackworth’s hand-lettering skill has made her famous as the Planner of Park Slope, designing beautiful custom journals for New York City’s elite. She has another skill too: reading signs that other people miss. Like the time she In this warm and witty romance from acclaimed author Kate Clayborn, one little word puts one woman’s business—and her heart—in jeopardy . . . Meg Mackworth’s hand-lettering skill has made her famous as the Planner of Park Slope, designing beautiful custom journals for New York City’s elite. She has another skill too: reading signs that other people miss. Like the time she sat across from Reid Sutherland and his gorgeous fiancée, and knew their upcoming marriage was doomed to fail. Weaving a secret word into their wedding program was a little unprofessional, but she was sure no one else would spot it. She hadn’t counted on sharp-eyed, pattern-obsessed Reid . . . A year later, Reid has tracked Meg down to find out—before he leaves New York for good—how she knew that his meticulously planned future was about to implode. But with a looming deadline, a fractured friendship, and a bad case of creative block, Meg doesn’t have time for Reid’s questions—unless he can help her find her missing inspiration. As they gradually open up to each other about their lives, work, and regrets, both try to ignore the fact that their unlikely connection is growing deeper. But the signs are there—irresistible, indisputable, urging Meg to heed the messages Reid is sending her, before it’s too late . . .

30 review for Love Lettering

  1. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    3.5 stars CHARMING! This is a sweet romance with well-developed characters and a little something different. Meg Mackworth, a letterer, has the gift of being able to decipher signs--Not signs of the universe, but actual signs. Letters, their format, font, hand-painted or printed, speak to her. She has turned her gift into art, but sometimes what she feels comes through in her work, as is the case when she designed a wedding invitation for a couple she thought doomed. What she didn’t realize is 3.5 stars CHARMING! This is a sweet romance with well-developed characters and a little something different. Meg Mackworth, a letterer, has the gift of being able to decipher signs--Not signs of the universe, but actual signs. Letters, their format, font, hand-painted or printed, speak to her. She has turned her gift into art, but sometimes what she feels comes through in her work, as is the case when she designed a wedding invitation for a couple she thought doomed. What she didn’t realize is that the groom, a mathematician, would be able to see the message she unintentionally wove into their handcrafted invitation. When the former groom, Reid, unexpectedly shows up a year later to confront Meg about her message, sparks fly and romance blooms. But as always, there is more to this story than meets the eye. There were a lot of elements that I loved about this book, including Kate Clayborn's writing and Meg’s character. Meg is intelligent with a strong voice and a unique gift. I also loved the emphasis on signs and the beauty of letters and Clayborn does a nice job of illuminating Meg’s connection with letters to the reader. There were some parts that I could have done without (the first sex scene felt like different characters and didn't feel natural) and others that just felt like they belonged in a different book. Outside of these moments, Love Lettering was a nice escape read. I won a copy of this book from a GoodReads giveaway!!!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dita

    Confession: I requested this book by mistake. I don't read or like romances because "feelings"... Ew, no thanks. But Meg and Reid? Cutie Patootie. And Kate Clayborn? Well, she can really write. Thank you to Kate Clayborn, Kensington and NetGalley for giving me this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    I couldn’t believe that I’m giving three romantic story with full of signs, shining with its bright lights of big city but unfortunately full of conspiracy and action parts, unexpected twisty turn of the story shattered my soft, swoony plot stars! When I read the excerpt of this book I cursed a few times, because it ended with a sweet cliffhanger and I thought I had to read this book ASAP.I wanted to devour it so passionately!!! I couldn’t give my soul as a payment method(most of my reviewer I couldn’t believe that I’m giving three romantic story with full of signs, shining with its bright lights of big city but unfortunately full of conspiracy and action parts, unexpected twisty turn of the story shattered my soft, swoony plot stars! When I read the excerpt of this book I cursed a few times, because it ended with a sweet cliffhanger and I thought I had to read this book ASAP.I wanted to devour it so passionately!!! I couldn’t give my soul as a payment method(most of my reviewer readers already know I sold it to Tom Ellis, later I learned he was not even real Lucifer, he was a bloody fictional, six-packed character!) but finally my waiting was over, I got my hands into this precious thing. Meg is a skilled artist, designing innovative, original custom journals and one day one of her client’s fiancée stops by at her office and shows her the wedding program she’d designed for them. He insists there was a secret code written there says: “MISTAKE” (He is a mathematician so he loves to crack codes or maybe he is a crack-head!) As it seems like it is an obnoxious, weird claim, Meg confesses him he is right and after that she explains him about the things she observed about he and his fiancee’s attitudes throughout their meeting. Before they say their goodbyes, Meg finds out Reid is about to live the city because he hates NY. Meg’s guilt feelings and her undeniable attraction to Reid helps her to form an idea on her mind. She needs an inspiration to design a special project for a job opportunity and Reid could help her with his logical, realistic, direct approach. She could also convince him to discover the city and the things he may love about big apple. Reid reluctantly accepts her offer and their big journey turns into an enjoyable game to find the signs and form different letters into meaningful words. So far the book seems like a delicious, different, entertaining rom-com, right? Meg is the representative of right part of the brain, creativity, artistic skills, dreaming, optimism are her strongest virtues. And Reid is a quiet representative of left part: mathematics, logic, reasoning, analytic thought. They complete each other so perfectly and of course their shyness towards each, the words they didn’t tell, the feeling they didn’t share, make you want to scream at them: “come on guys, you’re perfect for each other!” Of course I was waiting for the angst but the final surprising twist was a little overrated and exaggerated for me. I felt like I wasn’t reading a soft, sweet, swoony book and I started to read a thriller with its big schemes and conspiracy theories. That part of the book didn’t fit all the letters, magical signs, finding the glamorous love in the middle of the chaotic, crowded, dirty, cosmopolitan city of the earth! So I got really disappointed and I wished the author found another solution or big surprise that can be easily recovered from. Still I loved those characters and next visit at my NYC, I’ll start to take photos of the signs and play the game as like the characters did. I loved the concept and inspirational feelings that book gave me. If I could ignore the last third part of the book, I can give my four stars without thinking. So I still want to read more books of the author because she knows how to write about pure feelings and pour them down with proper, lyrical, soul brushing words. Special thanks to Netgalley and Kensington Books for sharing this romantic ARC COPY with me in exchange my honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Hollis

    This is a hard review to write because I want to get it right. Why I loved this. How extraordinary the writing is, the moments we were given, shown, even the ones that were hidden until they were ready to be told. To me, this a love story for all the people who were told they were mistakes or were mistaken, and even felt it in themselves. Who never got a do-over, never got a second chance, or the opportunity to explain themselves. It's a quiet story, in a way, one that just goes along with This is a hard review to write because I want to get it right. Why I loved this. How extraordinary the writing is, the moments we were given, shown, even the ones that were hidden until they were ready to be told. To me, this a love story for all the people who were told they were mistakes or were mistaken, and even felt it in themselves. Who never got a do-over, never got a second chance, or the opportunity to explain themselves. It's a quiet story, in a way, one that just goes along with things.. until it doesn't. I'll preface this, a little belatedly, by saying that if you don't love a little whimsy in your novels, if you can't use your imagination to bring something to mind, you might not always love this read. Fonts, lettering, as one might infer from the title, play a very big part. And I loved this. It offered a richness, a uniqueness, to the characters and this world — even if it is our own. And speaking of the characters.. they were all, equally, in their own way, five stars. With exception to one obvious selection (Cameron) and one maybe not so obvious (not naming names, cough, Sibby, cough). Meg was a delight; watching her come into her own, every step she made, every mistake.. it was lovely. Reid, however, I almost have no words for. This is the most charming of all romance heroes. Not a grump, not an alpha, not a jerk. Just a giant, awkward, stoic creature. A total gentleman, a diehard math nerd, completely out of his element in almost every situation. He stole my heart, totally, and every interaction between them was just.. I want more. "Reid, did you make a joke?" "Probably not. I'm not known for my sense of humour." For such a quiet story, the plot of this did take me a bit by surprise, but in hindsight everything slots into place. Every t gets crossed, every i gets its dot. But the banter, the chemistry, the build up.. everything, was fantastic. I hesitate to say more because, again, I really want to get this review right. I'm not sure I succeeded. Just know this book made me laugh, made me soft, made me gushingly share passages with a friend (who had already read it!) and, I mean, full stop, what better expresses a reader's love than that? At this point, all I can say is : read this book. 4.5 stars ** I received an ARC from the publisher (thank you!) in exchange for an honest review. ** --- This review can also be found at A Take From Two Cities.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Larry H

    4.5 stars. Love Lettering was a slow-burn rom-com that snuck up on me and grabbed my heart! First of all, I’ve got to say that this book wins for the most unusual professions of its main characters. Meg is a designer who specializes in hand lettering—she does in journals, planners, signs, cards, etc., and has even been called "The Planner of Park Slope"—and Reid is a quant, or quantitative analyst. (He’s a numbers guy in the finance world.) Meg met Reid about a year ago when she was finishing up 4.5 stars. Love Lettering was a slow-burn rom-com that snuck up on me and grabbed my heart! First of all, I’ve got to say that this book wins for the most unusual professions of its main characters. Meg is a designer who specializes in hand lettering—she does in journals, planners, signs, cards, etc., and has even been called "The Planner of Park Slope"—and Reid is a quant, or quantitative analyst. (He’s a numbers guy in the finance world.) Meg met Reid about a year ago when she was finishing up all of the printed material for his wedding. Something about that encounter and the dynamic between Reid and his fiancée compelled her to sneak a secret message of warning into their wedding program, amidst the frills, flowers, and fairies. No one will notice, right? A year later Reid returns, and wants to know how Meg knew that his marriage was doomed to fail. (Of course he found the message. He finds patterns and signs every day.) Of course, Meg is most worried what Reid's discovery—and the possibility of him going public with it—could do to her career. They couldn’t be more different from one another. But with a major deadline looming and her creativity blocked, Meg tries to enlist Reid into noticing the beauty of letters, fonts, and signs throughout New York City and Brooklyn. As the tension between them thaws, her creativity flows again. But both are tightly wound, heavily guarded people, unwilling and unable to let the other in. And when a scandal erupts, both must decide whether signs point to a future together or apart. "The point is...sometimes fighting isn't about leaving, it's about staying. It takes practice to get it right, and it's painful, but if you want to stay with people, you do it." This book was enjoyable and unique in many ways, even as it followed the traditional rom-com patterns. I loved the juxtaposition between the creative and the analytical, and Meg and Reid's relationship really seemed believable. This one isn’t too steamy (one or two scenes but that’s it) but the whole story, and Kate Clayborn's storytelling, are just so appealing. Check out my list of the best books I read in 2019 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2020/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2019.html. Check out my list of the best books of the decade at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2020/01/my-favorite-books-of-decade.html. See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com. Follow me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/the.bookishworld.of.yrralh/.

  6. 5 out of 5

    emma

    in a word: swoon. review to come / 4 stars ------------- just sat down to read a bit of this and accidentally read 100 pages. SIRI, CLEAR MY SCHEDULE. I'M BOOKED

  7. 4 out of 5

    Astrid - The Bookish Sweet Tooth

    TITLE: LOVE LETTERING AUTHOR: Kate Clayborn RELEASE DATE: December 31, 2019 GENRE: Contemporary Romance THEMES & TROPES: Opposites Attract RATING: 5 Stars CLIFFHANGER: No READ MY REVIEW ON THE BLOG When I read a sample of LOVE LETTERING a while ago, I knew I had to have this book. Kate Clayborn is a new-to-me author but what jumped right at me was her insane talent to bring multi-faceted characters to life over the course of a couple of pages and from a single point of view. I was so intrigued TITLE: LOVE LETTERING AUTHOR: Kate Clayborn RELEASE DATE: December 31, 2019 GENRE: Contemporary Romance THEMES & TROPES: Opposites Attract RATING: 5 Stars CLIFFHANGER: No READ MY REVIEW ON THE BLOG When I read a sample of LOVE LETTERING a while ago, I knew I had to have this book. Kate Clayborn is a new-to-me author but what jumped right at me was her insane talent to bring multi-faceted characters to life over the course of a couple of pages and from a single point of view. I was so intrigued that I wanted to see if the rest of the story would be able to fulfill the promise. Meg's whole thought process is built around letters. As a hand-lettering artist that's not surprising but it may distract you at first since she uses graphic design jargon. Fear not, it's not rocket science and if you know a little about fonts this will be fun because visualizing the things Meg saw in her mind became my favorite past time while reading this book. So heads up - this may start out a little slower for some readers. Meg and Reid are like Yin and Yang. Coffee and milk. Gin and Tonic. Ice cream and cone. You get the gist. Total opposites but perfect for one another. While Meg's creative, loyal and sweet character is being revealed through her thoughts, Reid's needs to be uncovered one layer after another through Meg's experience with him. To him numbers are what letters are to Meg, and if you thought you've read about multi-layered characters, try Reid Sutherland. At the beginning he comes across a bit stuffy, formal sometimes even a little rude and a lot sad but the deeper you get to know him the more his softer, more romantic and playful side becomes apparent. There is an unexpected sweetness to him that just had me fall head over heels for him. I know that I could have my eyes closed this way and I’d still know Reid’s kiss anywhere, because Reid’s kiss is everything I like about Reid—firm and direct, with a sweetness you have to know to truly recognize. Meg loves New York as much as Reid hates it. Together they discover the city from a completely different point of view by inventing games they play on their strolls together. And this is where the magic happens - I loved how Meg reflects on everything she does, how willing Reid is to learn Meg's language and how they obviously make each other happy. How Meg, who shies away from conflict in the beginning learns how to confront issues straight on. How this reserved man opens up to her and finds delight and love for the city he couldn't wait to leave in the beginning. “You’re the best part of this city,” he whispers... There is no point in the story where you can point at and say that they fell in love right there and then. It's a gradual, slow burn that will have you giddy for all their firsts. LOVE LETTERING is a clever, beautifully written story that shines and sparkles brilliantly and has so much depth and a lot of sweetness that never gets cloying. I enjoyed the development of Reid and Meg's relationship, the friendships that are an integral part of Meg's life and the twist towards the end, that took me by surprise. This book made me happy, so happy that I went and bought the audiobook. I'll be checking out Kate Clayborn's backlist! It feels like floating, like being untethered. Like writing without letters. Like counting without numbers. It feels like love.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Blackjack

    As it turns out, my favorite book this year is an arc for 2020. I've enjoyed all of Kate Clayborn's books and she just keeps getting better and better with each one. Love Lettering is my favorite for many reasons, and not least because it is elegantly and intricately written, with each piece of the story falling perfectly into place to illuminate key themes of the life of an artist, of how we navigate our way in the world through visual images, and of how much we rely on visual cues to As it turns out, my favorite book this year is an arc for 2020. I've enjoyed all of Kate Clayborn's books and she just keeps getting better and better with each one. Love Lettering is my favorite for many reasons, and not least because it is elegantly and intricately written, with each piece of the story falling perfectly into place to illuminate key themes of the life of an artist, of how we navigate our way in the world through visual images, and of how much we rely on visual cues to communicate effectively with loved ones. While the book is at heart as romantic as romance novels get, the romance unfolds slowly and visually and at times made me feel as if I was watching a film -- perhaps just on an aesthetic level, Woody Allen's Manhattan in its ode to falling in love in the great city itself. In Clayborn's novels I've noticed that the main characters often revere a medium of art and find their way to each other through it, an extended metaphor of art is love and love is art. In Beginner's Luck the main couple discover each other as they restore an old home, taking mutual pleasure in the hunt for the perfect antique knob for a cabinet door. In Best of Luck, the couple fall in love while working together on a photography project. The process of taking the perfect photo leads them deeper into love with each other. Here though in Love Lettering I do think Clayborn interweaves the art and artistic world of calligraphy so thoroughly with the romance that it's impossible to separate the two. Meg's unique creative work as a calligrapher and Reid's impending marriage and need for a wedding program initially bring them together. They see things in each other in their first meeting that haunt them and haunt much of the plot of the story. Everything, even numbers, become a sign that keeps them continually in each other's orbit as they slowly attempt to build on moments together. At times, especially early in the novel, their interactions range from painfully awkward, hesitant, and even hostile, but it is hard to shake the sense that fascination, attraction, simpatico, ultimately love, and maybe even fate undergird all of their interactions. I felt riveted by each encounter. Each scene builds on the previous on, creating a complex relationship to show us how perfectly Meg and Reid suit each other, even as the characters themselves struggle to understand their connection. As a former resident of Manhattan, I felt pleasure in the many walks the couple took taking photos of signs and graphic images to try to articulate their feelings and their lives to each other, and yet I also sympathized with Reid's sensory overload living in the city entails. Falling in love with the city ends up becoming as complicated as falling in love with the person. And yet, can I just say how happy I am to read a contemporary urban romance. And in keeping with Clayborn's view of the world, this novel, like all of her books, is peopled with diversity. It's also wonderfully filled with stories of acceptance and forgiveness. She creates a world where women are kind to other women and flaws do not end relationships. She is very much an author who likes and respects women. And finally, many romance authors today are creating wonderfully respectful and loving men. Reid Sutherland is right up there as one of the best. We meet him and get to know him through Meg's eyes, and so we learn along with her how to read all of his signs that make him such a wonderful hero. In keeping with the theme of this book, I hope my first reading experience of 2020 is a sign & harbinger for what's to come in the new year.💞

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joanna Loves Reading

    I stayed up late finishing this book. That is a rare occurrence these days. So while I don’t think this was perfect, it was consuming. It was intricate and interesting and unique. This is the story of Meg, a hand letterer who is having a bit of a mid-life crisis. She has a big career opportunity and is having a creative block and is lonely, with her best friend drifting away. This has a romance but Meg was central to the story as it is told from her POV entirely. I do prefer a less one-sided I stayed up late finishing this book. That is a rare occurrence these days. So while I don’t think this was perfect, it was consuming. It was intricate and interesting and unique. This is the story of Meg, a hand letterer who is having a bit of a mid-life crisis. She has a big career opportunity and is having a creative block and is lonely, with her best friend drifting away. This has a romance but Meg was central to the story as it is told from her POV entirely. I do prefer a less one-sided story with greater interaction between the hero and heroine, but Clayborn weaves magic here and drew me in. Reid, the hero, was lovely. He was shy, reserved, awkward. He was honest, caring and patient. While I loved Meg, I would have enjoyed Reid’s POV too. Their attraction was clear from the start, and how they overcame their self-imposed obstacles was a fun journey. So, I have been sitting on this review for a week now. And I haven’t been sure what I wanted to say. These things come easy sometimes, others not. I guess it’s a not this time. What I know is that Kate Clayborn is an amazing writer. Her writing moves me in small or significant ways every time I read her stories. This was no exception. *Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. This is my honest opinion.

  10. 4 out of 5

    *The Angry Reader*

    Have you ever reached 15, 20% in a “romance” book and thought “there’s nothing here for me. I don’t understand these characters. I don’t see myself anywhere?” That happens to me - over and over again. Sometimes a book is just a book - and sometimes it’s more. It sends a message about relationships and how we feel about ourselves and What an author thinks about women and love. In 2018 I read 253 books. In 2017 I read 299. 2018 had 31 “best of the year” books. 2017 had 36. So about 12% of my reads Have you ever reached 15, 20% in a “romance” book and thought “there’s nothing here for me. I don’t understand these characters. I don’t see myself anywhere?” That happens to me - over and over again. Sometimes a book is just a book - and sometimes it’s more. It sends a message about relationships and how we feel about ourselves and What an author thinks about women and love. In 2018 I read 253 books. In 2017 I read 299. 2018 had 31 “best of the year” books. 2017 had 36. So about 12% of my reads made it to my “best of” list. This is my 118th book this year. And it’ll be my 35th “best of 2019” book. My rate of awesome book is growing. I used to devour shifter romances. Vampires. Men who felt it was okay to answer a serious inquire with “babe.” But I grew uncomfortable. I read some articles about reading. I found this cadre of reviewers who wrote reviews that made me feel smart. And heard. And understood. And I started picking different books to read. Kate Clayborn is the current apex of my reading metamorphosis. An author who clearly likes women - she makes my awkward, worried, 39 year old self feel seen. And loved. Represented. Meg was quirky. Making bad decisions - mistakes even. She struggled with some ghosts of her past. She was also adorable. Believable. Compelling and smart. I rode every high and every low in this book with her - breath held or grinning ear to ear. There’s something magical about a heroine I can respect - they are scarce on the ground in contemporary romance. And Reid. Stoic awkwardness is a big fat turn on. Reid had me making heart eyes early on with his rudeness and his discomfort and his tics. Reid was authentic and real and a joy to read. This is one of the best slow burns I’ve ever read. And also likely the best book I read in 2019. An ode to self-respect and real conversations and doing the right thing and the hard thing and not running away. A book that celebrates intelligence and consent partnership and all the best things about relationships. I couldn’t put this book down, and I am ecstatic about watching your reviews roll in. I think you all are going to love this.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sam (AMNReader)

    When I started reading this book, all I could think of was the phrase killing me softly This book is full of this quiet angst, the kind you feel everyday in relationships. The kind you relate to, wondering what you did, where you went wrong, if mistakes are really ever forgiven and what they mean. And holy hell, this will be my fourth review of Kate Clayborn where I'm at a loss for what to even say. It will be a time I say once again why I love her-her inclusiveness as a matter-of-life. Her When I started reading this book, all I could think of was the phrase killing me softly This book is full of this quiet angst, the kind you feel everyday in relationships. The kind you relate to, wondering what you did, where you went wrong, if mistakes are really ever forgiven and what they mean. And holy hell, this will be my fourth review of Kate Clayborn where I'm at a loss for what to even say. It will be a time I say once again why I love her-her inclusiveness as a matter-of-life. Her feminism, quietly shining through the page. Her evolved men who are clearly, incredibly leaders without (and sometimes with) the grunting physical presence. Is that enough? I will mention her settings again. This time, in New York, this time taking in every sign and letter. Relating numbers to letters. As if I didn't love this author enough. Her settings, the characters careers, the secondary characters all speak to make a complete, beautiful, fully alive story. And she twists the knife. Subtly, slowly. And you just get it. You feel it. But that's not all. Because this is key: She writes extraordinary love stories for basically ordinary people falling in love in ordinary ways. She does so convincingly, quietly....killing us softly. Reid and Meg burst with courage. They grow because of each other. They explore vulnerabilities, so much so we often take a deep breath with Meg when she begins her direct confrontations. And though I didn't find what Reid was doing much of a mystery, I appreciated the way it was integrated in the story and the conflict it created. It was well done without being sensationalized. This book is all first person POV, and I didn't mind. I enjoyed getting to know Reid through Meg's open book. Through her loneliness and desperation, and I enjoyed getting to see her friends in the same way. And despite this, I felt I knew Reid quite well because he was direct. That said, he is easily one of the most unique heroes I've ever read. Reid still felt whole, and I just loved him. I loved everyone in this book. I loved Meg's development and finding her own way. I loved the settings. Her unique job. His unique passion. Love, Love, Love, it beats. yep, that about sums it up. I would like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for this ARC. This has not affected my views on this book. I can't wait to get my hard copy, in fact.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ira

    What a lovely lovely romance. I read it in one sitting in two decades! Hah! My first book finished this year and my first by this author too. Her books already in my TBR list for sometimes but I’m very picky with Contemporary Romance lately. However, Love Lettering sounds unusual and very intriguing, and I’m glad to have this one as my 2020’s first read. Btw, Happy New Year 2020 my goodreads friends. Happy Reading to you all too, I hope we will have many fantastic reading this year! xoxo What a lovely lovely romance. I read it in one sitting in two decades! Hah! 😂 My first book finished this year and my first by this author too. Her books already in my TBR list for sometimes but I’m very picky with Contemporary Romance lately. However, Love Lettering sounds unusual and very intriguing, and I’m glad to have this one as my 2020’s first read. ❤️❤️❤️ Btw, Happy New Year 2020 my goodreads friends. Happy Reading to you all too, I hope we will have many fantastic reading this year! xoxo

  13. 5 out of 5

    Aisling Zena

    I'm all for this concept and blurb!! But damn that 2020 publishing date is killing me!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Patty (IheartYA)

    Syrupy sweet, Love Lettering is a romance with a very, very slow beating heart. The premise had potential and I really wanted to like it more than I did. The characters are endearing and charming, but the story is bogged down by poor pacing and semi- torturous, long winded inner monologue. I was surprised and blindsided by the sex scene as it seemed to not flow with the rest of the story. Cute and quirky storyline, la la la, then BOOM--hot and heavy. I trudged through and probably would have Syrupy sweet, Love Lettering is a romance with a very, very slow beating heart. The premise had potential and I really wanted to like it more than I did. The characters are endearing and charming, but the story is bogged down by poor pacing and semi- torturous, long winded inner monologue. I was surprised and blindsided by the sex scene as it seemed to not flow with the rest of the story. Cute and quirky storyline, la la la, then BOOM--hot and heavy. I trudged through and probably would have abandoned this book if it weren't a NetGalley copy. I appreciate the author's effort but the execution of this story left much to be wanted. 2 stars/5 Thank you to NetGalley for granting me a copy for review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Books Just 4 Me

    Meg, a whimsical artistic letterer, and Reid, a serious analytical no-nonsense man, meet for a second time when he confronts her about how she knew his relationship would fail. They both have an underlying connection of looking for signs and decoding messages. I’m not going to lie, I had a hard time getting into this book. I’d say until I hit the 25% mark I was struggling, lots of letter references. I was trying to wrap my brain around all the letter descriptions. Meg is having a creative block Meg, a whimsical artistic letterer, and Reid, a serious analytical no-nonsense man, meet for a second time when he confronts her about how she knew his relationship would fail. They both have an underlying connection of looking for signs and decoding messages. I’m not going to lie, I had a hard time getting into this book. I’d say until I hit the 25% mark I was struggling, lots of letter references. I was trying to wrap my brain around all the letter descriptions. Meg is having a creative block and she convinces Reid to help her sort it out. I’m so glad I stuck it out though because it was such a good love story! They truly learn about themselves and discover each other. It’s a slow building relationship where they learn what makes each other tick. They’re both so different but it’s written so well you appreciate how they complement each other perfectly. I loved her reference to Reid as being very masterpiece theater. Since I like historical fiction, I got everyone one of the references and they cracked me up. I can completely visualize how Reid was acting. I was hooked in how they shared their lives with each other and their bond grew. This book had substance and a real story underneath that so many romances don’t have. It was so well written and I couldn’t put it down at the end. The beginning was a little abstract for me but I understand the purpose of it in defining Meg. LOVED this story and highly recommend it. Thank you to Kensington & NetGalley for the opportunity to read this book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nen & Jen

    I'm in love <3 Officially. After having read the first chapter of this book, thanks to receiving an excerpt from the publisher via Netgalley, this will be my most anticipated read for Jan 2020. My only complaint? JANUARY 2020! That's too far away.... The first chapter follows instagram star and calligraphy artist, Meg and her intriguing ability to predict the failure of her customers', Reid and Cecelia's, marriage. Reid (the dashing but broody groom) has since turned up at Meg's New York shop I'm in love <3 Officially. After having read the first chapter of this book, thanks to receiving an excerpt from the publisher via Netgalley, this will be my most anticipated read for Jan 2020. My only complaint? JANUARY 2020! That's too far away.... The first chapter follows instagram star and calligraphy artist, Meg and her intriguing ability to predict the failure of her customers', Reid and Cecelia's, marriage. Reid (the dashing but broody groom) has since turned up at Meg's New York shop following the ending of his relationship with Cecelia - wanting to know Meg's secret for having predicted their failure before anyone else. The ensuing drama is sure to follow...along with me...in JANUARY. Why, oh why, does it have to be so far? After having gotten my grubby mits on the first chapter I'm eagerly awaiting more. This is definitely one to keep your eye on <3

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    Probably going to be pelted with rotten fruit and veg by romancelandia for not unequivocally loving this but whateverrrrrr. So what happened here? It was like I read a book of two parts. The first part (which was almost 50%) I thought was excellent and easily going the way of 5 stars. I loved Meg; loved getting to know her. I loved the way her job was written about, and the way you can be doing well, know you’re good at what you do, but still not be satisfied. She had relationships independent of Probably going to be pelted with rotten fruit and veg by romancelandia for not unequivocally loving this but whateverrrrrr. So what happened here? It was like I read a book of two parts. The first part (which was almost 50%) I thought was excellent and easily going the way of 5 stars. I loved Meg; loved getting to know her. I loved the way her job was written about, and the way you can be doing well, know you’re good at what you do, but still not be satisfied. She had relationships independent of the one with Reid. Basically she was allowed to have a life. The writing was beautiful and made everything feel so warm and lovely and real. And the feels, omg. So plentiful. There was just lots of really, really good stuff in the first part. Then… God, I don’t know. But something changed. Where the writing was beautiful, it then became something I noticed the tense it was written in. Reid went from being someone I was intrigued by, to someone I wanted Brock Lesner to send to Suplex City. And Meg? My wonderful, wonderful Meg? I went from thinking I knew her to being baffled about her choices. The disconnect between the two parts was such that I did wonder if the second part was rewritten. The first red flag about this going from a 5 star read to… not, was how irritated I got about the first sex scene. Something that’s become a pet peeve of mine in cishet m/f romances is when heroines have some sort of sex hang-up, only for that hang-up to be magically banged out of them (or into? if it’s a matter of never having had an orgasm) by the hero’s magical dick. Here, Meg has some problems when it comes to orgasming which ceases being a problem once she has sex for the first time with Reid. Because OF FUCKING COURSE. God forbid Meg’s allowed to know her own body. Or have good sex prior to Reid. Or continue to not always have an easy time of it when it comes to coming and for that to be treated as something that’s, you know, actually probably fine? I also didn’t enjoy the whole Meg & Sibby thing. Initially I really loved that we got to see what it can be like when a close friendship is breaking. The confusion and hurt Meg felt was painful to read, with the way it was written feeling relatable. Even when the inevitable showdown between the two revealed some jealousy pertaining to Meg having a successful career and seemingly not needing to be so reliant on Sibby (because OF FUCKING COURSE women have to be jealous of each other), I was still on board because after clearing the air, Meg & Sibby going in different directions felt like the right thing for the both of them. Then when The Big Thing with Reid happens (which I will get to later), and Sibby comes back to Meg, I felt… unsettled about it? I think Sibby coming back was done with the intent of having it seem like she was showing up for Meg when it mattered? But... I didn’t see it like that. It felt to me like Sibby came back purely because Meg’s life/career was in chaos, which meant she and they could assume the roles they had prior to things falling apart. Speaking from experience, a friendship like what I feel theirs was isn’t one that’s sustainable. It just can’t be if there’s such an emotional imbalance and one-sidedness. Basically I finished Love Lettering feeling as though I was leaving Meg entrenched in a toxic friendship. When you read a lot of queer books, especially by queer authors, it’s maybe a little easier to spot the difference between a genuine attempt at inclusiveness and token diversity in non queer books. And with the introduction of a minor queer character (and she really was very minor), I felt Love Lettering was guilty of token diversity. When your only queer character can be described as a “queer special agent”, and queer can be replaced by any other word relating to a marginalised person without it changing the character—then that’s not being inclusive. It just comes across more like you want cookies for being seen to be inclusive but without actually bothering to treat that person like an actual person and fleshing out their character. It was so poorly done and I really hated that a book which had so much warmth and heart at times did that. OKAY LET’S TALK ABOUT REID. It’s very apparent early on that he has a secret—but Jesus Christ on a cracker did I hate what it was. My reaction was very much influenced by how much I hate deception. And look. I get the seriousness of what Reid was hiding and that legally he wasn’t allowed to talk about what was going on. BUT. He still had the option to (a) not start anything romantically with Meg in the first place, (b) of calling things off when ~feelings became a thing, or (c) calling things off once he learned that Meg had grown up being lied to and the impact that lying had on her life. What added to my anger was the ripples from what Reid was hiding ended up affecting Meg’s career. Yes, he couldn’t have predicted it but there was always going to be consequences borne from that level of deception, and not knowing what those might have been didn’t give him a pass, imo. Alsoooo. I hated that instead of his deception being something he explained to Meg’s face, it was done via a letter and what he said was enough for Meg to be okay. I mean. Ugh. I get the author was likely going for symbology? But when a portion of the book was spent with Meg trying to learn how to fight in the right way (argument-wise and not fisticuff-wise), her being denied a grovel she was owed not only allowed Reid to wriggle off the hook, but it also made a part of the book redundant. I personally wouldn’t have been able to forgive what he did, but nowhere near enough was done to show why and how Meg was able to. I think there’s a lot to like about Love Lettering—it did a lot right. I can see why readers do/will love it. But the second half of the book went in directions that made it hard for me, personally, to believe a solid relationship could be built on such deceptive foundations, and that in turn meant I didn’t believe in Meg & Reid’s HEA. arc provided by the publisher via netgalley

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Leone-campbell

    Meg Mackworth is a famous hand-lettering creator who has designed one-of-a-kind wedding invitations and has now branched out on her own. Due to the popularity of her craft, the New York Times ran a feature on her which made her even more in demand. But Meg has a secret, one she thought she only knew. In her work, she sometimes hides words through her spellings which are known only to her. They can be her thoughts and feelings about the project she has done. So when Reid Sutherland comes into the Meg Mackworth is a famous hand-lettering creator who has designed one-of-a-kind wedding invitations and has now branched out on her own. Due to the popularity of her craft, the New York Times ran a feature on her which made her even more in demand. But Meg has a secret, one she thought she only knew. In her work, she sometimes hides words through her spellings which are known only to her. They can be her thoughts and feelings about the project she has done. So when Reid Sutherland comes into the shop she is working at and announces to Meg that he saw what she had written on his and his ex-fiancé's wedding invitation and he wants to know why and how she knew, Meg is flabbergasted. For some curious reason Meg is relieved Reid did not marry. And Meg, who is trying to prepare for what could be a life-changing job interview and is in need of some new inspiration is curious as to how Reid was able to find her secret. On a whim she asks Reid, a math and numbers man, if he would be interested in playing a game with her and go around and look for hidden words in signs all over New York City. As Meg and Reid begin to connect through of all things the awkwardness of life in general which they have discovered they have in common, they launch into a once in a lifetime relationship. But suddenly all the signs and words begin to change as does their relationship... Will they be able to recapture the joy and compatibility they shared? For some people who have a tendency to think outside the box, life can be a very lonely world. To find someone who thinks as you do can be transformative. Love Lettering is just a beautiful, loving, heart aching story about two lost souls who find each other while accidentally reading into all the signs. Thank you #NetGalley #KensingtonPress #KateClayborn #LoveLettering for the advanced copy. Love Lettering come out December 31.

  19. 5 out of 5

    OLT

    I truly appreciated the style and quality of the writing and the easy-breezy plot exposition in this new romance by Kate Clayborn. So my inability to give the book more than a 3-star rating has more to do with "It's not the book; it's me." Our heroine Meg is a popular hand-letterer/calligrapher who does intricate hand-written invitations, cards, journals, etc., for her clients. Meg can't resist putting secret messages into her designs, but there's no harm, no foul, since nobody has managed to I truly appreciated the style and quality of the writing and the easy-breezy plot exposition in this new romance by Kate Clayborn. So my inability to give the book more than a 3-star rating has more to do with "It's not the book; it's me." Our heroine Meg is a popular hand-letterer/calligrapher who does intricate hand-written invitations, cards, journals, etc., for her clients. Meg can't resist putting secret messages into her designs, but there's no harm, no foul, since nobody has managed to find them in her work so far. But that's until the day that she is confronted by a former client, Reid, whose wedding invitations she had created for his future bride with the hidden message M-I-S-T-A-K-E. Turns out that the wedding never occurred and Reid, a quantitative analyst, had discovered the hidden message and now wants to know how she knew his marriage would have been a mistake. Meg, at this particular moment, is having a problem with creativity block and Reid is disgruntled with life in NYC and plans to leave as soon as is feasible. So she suggests they walk the city, she to find meaning again in her work and he to learn to appreciate the Big Apple. Along the way, there are issues in the personal lives of both that are revealed and must be addressed. Meg has had a recent devastating revelation about her past and, in addition, is feeling estrangement from her best friend and roommate. Reid has his own problems, both personal and professional to deal with. And, of course, there is the necessary romance between the two which will develop relatively slowly and fairly well. Okay. Good enough. The story moves along pretty well. The characters are appealing enough. I should have liked this contemporary romance more than I did. As I said earlier, the problem is definitely me. Lately I am feeling older-than-dirt, disgruntled, disheartened, discouraged and saddened by what's going on in the country and even in the world. With the looming threat of climate change, the huge inequality gap between the haves and the have-nots, deregulation of protective measures for the environment and for the consumer, xenophobia and intolerance, and on and on and on, I found it almost impossible to relate to the problems of these characters. Meg, for example, makes her living by catering to rich clients, the ones who can afford more than the usual mass-produced products that most of us middle class and upper-middle class folks can afford. In other words, her chosen career is not in my list of 21st-century professions that contribute to the common good. Pay no attention to me. I'm just feeling particularly grumpy and picky and annoyed lately.

  20. 4 out of 5

    aarya

    A review: https://smartbitchestrashybooks.com/r... Disclaimer: I received a free e-ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christie«SHBBblogger»

    Title: Love Lettering Series: Standalone Author: Kate Clayborn Release date: December 31, 2019 Cliffhanger: No Genre: contemporary romance It feels like floating, like being untethered. Like writing without letters. Like counting without numbers. It feels like love. This book saved me from the dreaded end of the year book funk! I had no idea what to expect, but I did read a sample earlier in the year which impressed me. So I was cautiously hopeful that this would finally be the book to bring back my Title: Love Lettering Series: Standalone Author: Kate Clayborn Release date: December 31, 2019 Cliffhanger: No Genre: contemporary romance It feels like floating, like being untethered. Like writing without letters. Like counting without numbers. It feels like love. This book saved me from the dreaded end of the year book funk! I had no idea what to expect, but I did read a sample earlier in the year which impressed me. So I was cautiously hopeful that this would finally be the book to bring back my missing excitement. Don't get me wrong, I've had some decent reads. But there is good, there's great, and then there's giddy. This was a giddy book, much to my surprise. I fell hard for the entire set of characters, and had more than one moment where I stopped to savor the warm feelings from this adorable couple. It's kind of fitting that this was the book to bring the joy back again. I feel like I was finding mine right along with the two main characters. Meg is a calligraphy artist who designs a variety of products for clients looking for a personal touch. After moving to New York with her best friend, she's grown a considerable following online and has made a name for herself as The Planner of Park Slope. Yes, she has a achieved a level of success anyone would envy, but for some time she's been stuck in a creative rut. This lag in inspiration caused her to distract herself by doing something more than a little reckless. Putting hidden messages in her work isn't her brightest idea, but it was intended to be her little secret. Harmless, until Reid's gift for code brings him to her door looking for answers. After all, wouldn't anyone want to know how a complete stranger could predict his engagement imploding? When you first meet Reid, he gives every appearance of being the definition of dull and stuffy. He's clearly sharp as a tack, doggedly direct and blunt, but I wondered if his brilliance would be enough to win me over. Let me assure you, he has many hidden layers just waiting to be peeled back and examined. It takes some time to get there, but the attraction between them is a slow burn that's well worth the wait. Reid reveals himself to be lonely, unhappy, and shouldering some sort of burden at work that leaves him itching to leave the city. The dissolution of his engagement seems to be the least of his worries, but the reader is left in the dark over what weighs so heavily on him. What we do know is that being around Meg reminds him to find delight in the little things again. They begin a tentative friendship during walks around the city, and through their studies of hand-lettered signs they both find hope along the winding path. His sometimes brutal honesty teaches her how to confront difficulties in her life head-on rather than sidestepping confrontation. His lackluster view of the city is transformed as she teaches him how to have fun in the simplest of ways. It's not always easy or comfortable. Jarring yourself out of long-standing comfort zones has a learning curve that's often messy and downright confusing. But with each baby step they take together, they grow stronger. More confident in their new direction. She finds a soft, romantic side under his reserve that feels like a gift when it's revealed. Just a faint quirk of his mouth or an sudden burst of laughter from her irreverence is enough to make her feel like she conquered the world. This taciturn man is much, much more than he allows the people around him to see. I know that I could have my eyes closed this way and I’d still know Reid’s kiss anywhere, because Reid’s kiss is everything I like about Reid—firm and direct, with a sweetness you have to know to truly recognize. They each have a small subplot running alongside the main story. A broken lifelong friendship she doesn't know how to put back together, and his unhappiness with his career in general merge in the end with a big twist I didn't see coming. Secrets are unearthed, and the safe haven they found in each other's company is abruptly tested to its limits. The conflict at the end could have easily felt overdramatized, but somehow it worked. It made me fall in love with Reid even more than I thought possible, showing his strength of character and depth of feeling for Meg. When he first declared his feelings for her, I melted into a puddle of goo when he told her she left a "Meg-shaped shadow" in her absence. I thought nothing could top it. I read the passage twice in a row, savoring the unexpected romance of it. Then he writes his love letter to her and I fell even harder. Meg and Reid are opposites in every way imaginable. Each side of one counterbalances a side of the other, making a perfect, matched pair. He's analytical, she's fanciful. He's reserved, she's warm and easygoing. But the main difference between them? Letters and numbers. This is a strong theme running throughout the story that was so fresh and whimsical. I can't think of one contemporary romance that is remotely like this one so that gets huge brownie points from me. Admittedly, the descriptions of Meg's letter observations can be a little rambling at times. But the originality of this heartwarming story, the surprises to be found in the cracks and crevices made the occasional wordiness well worth it. I really adored this author's style of writing, the wittiness of it, and the meaning she infused in such a lighthearted plot. I can't recommend this one enough to anyone looking for a quirky romance that thinks outside the box. Meg and Reid are guaranteed to steal your hearts. FOLLOW SMOKIN HOT BOOK BLOG ON:

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nursebookie

    Kate Clayborn’s book, Love Lettering was truly a work of art for me. I was engrossed with the story from the very first page. I did not stop and was fully engrossed with the story and the characters. Clayborn wrote a beautiful love story that developed organically with amazing dialogue with all the swoon and feels you will crave for. Our amazing story begins with Meg Mackworth, who is a popular and talented hand lettering artist who was working with a couple on their wedding program. Meg knew Kate Clayborn’s book, Love Lettering was truly a work of art for me. I was engrossed with the story from the very first page. I did not stop and was fully engrossed with the story and the characters. Clayborn wrote a beautiful love story that developed organically with amazing dialogue with all the swoon and feels you will crave for. Our amazing story begins with Meg Mackworth, who is a popular and talented hand lettering artist who was working with a couple on their wedding program. Meg knew without a doubt from their first meeting that Reid Sutherland and her gorgeous fiancée’s marriage would be doomed to fail. Meg decides she would incorporate a hidden and secret message within the wedding program design. Unbeknownst to her, Reid was pattern obsessed and noticed the sign Meg left in their program. A year later, Reid tracks down Meg to let her know she knew about the message she left and asks questions before he leaves New York permanently. This starts an unusual friendship and an unlikely connection with each other. Meg is trying to gain more inspiration for her new project, Planner of Park Slope, and works with Reid trying to find these hand lettered signs all over the boroughs of New York City. Will Meg be as astute in reading the signs Reid is leaving for her? There were parts of the book where the writing was just so perfect when Meg and Reid start to recognize their attraction for each other, and that part really took my breath away. There were many moments like that where Clayborn’s writing sparks with brilliance in the way she writes the story. Nothing forced but oh my goodness, how do you pull at all my heart strings! I was glad to see hand lettering featured in the story as handwriting is becoming a lost art – but happy to see that there is a trend in its growing popularity among artists, and in social media that is influencing many more people. I notice that after reading this book, my appreciation and taking notice for hand lettering signs have increased and at times makes me smile and think what Meg and Reid would have thought about this. Thank you to the amazing team at Kensington, Michelle and Samantha, for their wonderful support of this amazing book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Darla

    A relevant romance that finished strong. It starts with a slow burn and as the 50% mark approached, I was considering a three-star rating. The relationship-building was sweet. For my old-fashioned sensibilities they put the cart before the horse and caused additional complications. Then comes a major event for which I had missed all the signs -- just like Meg. I thought the last third of the book was a great addition giving the narrative much more substance than your average romance. Meg's A relevant romance that finished strong. It starts with a slow burn and as the 50% mark approached, I was considering a three-star rating. The relationship-building was sweet. For my old-fashioned sensibilities they put the cart before the horse and caused additional complications. Then comes a major event for which I had missed all the signs -- just like Meg. I thought the last third of the book was a great addition giving the narrative much more substance than your average romance. Meg's struggles to define herself through her work and what she learns about healthy relationships is also so valuable. This new release is relevant in a world of bullet journaling and creativity instagram videos. Meg and Reid's story would most definitely appeal to some book groups as well. Thank you to Kensington Books and NetGalley for a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 4 out of 5

    b.andherbooks

    What can I say about Love Lettering? The writing is so gloriously evocative of the craft of the heroine that I dreamt in script? That I almost wore out the highlight button on my Kindle? That Reid and Meg have my heart? I fell in love with Kate Clayborn's writing with the Chance of a Lifetime series and this book just cements her place as an important voice in the Romance genre. Thank you to the publisher for the ARC. I will write a better review when I have collected my feelings! Okay so I'm What can I say about Love Lettering? The writing is so gloriously evocative of the craft of the heroine that I dreamt in script? That I almost wore out the highlight button on my Kindle? That Reid and Meg have my heart? I fell in love with Kate Clayborn's writing with the Chance of a Lifetime series and this book just cements her place as an important voice in the Romance genre. Thank you to the publisher for the ARC. I will write a better review when I have collected my feelings! Okay so I'm still having trouble putting my thoughts together in to a coherent review, but honestly just go read the on Aarya Marsden wrote over on Smart Bitches. It is brilliant. I'm just here to say I love this story so absolutely much AND that the audiobook is perfection. The wonderful narrator makes Meg and Reid's raw loneliness and their slow-burn chemistry absolutely come alive. Hearing Reid's "Good." is UNF.

  25. 4 out of 5

    shre ♡

    DNF @ 40% i'm sorry.....there was entirely too much detail about words and letters and the art of lettering and not enough dialogue or.....you know.....PLOT....so this just wasn't for me. don't get me wrong.....i enjoy a little scribbling in cursive and fancy swish-swooshes to practice for when i'm rich and famous and people ask me for autographs, but i don't spend day and night dedicated to the craft. it IS however for people who: (a) enjoy spending countless hours choosing fonts (b) go broke in DNF @ 40% i'm sorry.....there was entirely too much detail about words and letters and the art of lettering and not enough dialogue or.....you know.....PLOT....so this just wasn't for me. don't get me wrong.....i enjoy a little scribbling in cursive and fancy swish-swooshes to practice for when i'm rich and famous and people ask me for autographs, but i don't spend day and night dedicated to the craft. it IS however for people who: (a) enjoy spending countless hours choosing fonts (b) go broke in the Papyrus store (c) hand-craft every single one of their greeting cards (d) all of the above and yes this IS a love story, but it seems more between the main character and the alphabet. and also her rediscovery of her love for her profession. which is totally okay though, we love a creative and artistic queen, and i could never in a million years be as talented as she sounds.

  26. 4 out of 5

    T. Rosado

    5 “Swoonsh” Stars! This is my very first Kate Clayborn read and if the rest of her library is half as good as Love Lettering, I'm destined to become a devoted reader. Love Letting was told in a single-POV by the heroine Meg. Fortunately, with Meg's apt and expressive voice, I never felt that I missed Reid's POV. I quickly fell for him and his regal poise, brusque honesty, and insecure tics, all shared through Meg’s keen observation. As for her, Meg’s character stirred a reaction in me and I simply 5 “Swoonsh” Stars! This is my very first Kate Clayborn read and if the rest of her library is half as good as Love Lettering, I'm destined to become a devoted reader. Love Letting was told in a single-POV by the heroine Meg. Fortunately, with Meg's apt and expressive voice, I never felt that I missed Reid's POV. I quickly fell for him and his regal poise, brusque honesty, and insecure tics, all shared through Meg’s keen observation. As for her, Meg’s character stirred a reaction in me and I simply felt like I understood her. I may not have ever had the exact thought processes as Meg in relation to her artistic pursuits, but I got how her artistry infiltrated her view of the world. I was fascinated by her compulsion to assign letters, shapes, and lines to what she saw and to what she felt, emotionally. Together, Reid and Meg are best described as lovely. After a somewhat complicated beginning, the couple chose to become (mostly) transparent with each other. It was a reader’s delight to experience this couple's journey without the miscommunication and omissions that so often plague couples in contemporary romance. Therefore, the angst and conflict were more authentic and less manufactured by unnecessary drama. The entirety of Love Lettering was a leisurely-paced, slow burn romance and it was EVERYTHING! If a book is going to move at a slower, but consistent pace, it needs to keep me invested with interesting details, meaningful characters, and graceful prose. LL had all of that along with some delicious swoon, witty banter, sweet friendships, and a convincing twist. Aside from everything positive that I've already highlighted, the grandest compliment I can bestow is this: Kate Clayborn doesn't feel the need to spell out every thought or contemplation in a character's head, but allows the smart reader to draw the right conclusion by showing through physical actions and responses. I absolutely love when an author treats the reader with above par intelligence and doesn't relay redundant information or stay in a character's head beyond what is obviously necessary. For me, Love Lettering was unequivocally original and enchanting. It was near perfect in it's pacing, writing, and story arc along with the sweetest romantic reward. Absolutely, sigh-worthy!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Books Just 4 Me

    Meg, a whimsical artistic letterer, and Reid, a serious analytical no-nonsense man, meet for a second time when he confronts her about how she knew his relationship would fail. They both have an underlying connection of looking for signs and decoding messages. I’m not going to lie, I had a hard time getting into this book. I’d say until I hit the 25% mark I was struggling, lots of letter references. I was trying to wrap my brain around all the letter descriptions. Meg is having a creative block Meg, a whimsical artistic letterer, and Reid, a serious analytical no-nonsense man, meet for a second time when he confronts her about how she knew his relationship would fail. They both have an underlying connection of looking for signs and decoding messages. I’m not going to lie, I had a hard time getting into this book. I’d say until I hit the 25% mark I was struggling, lots of letter references. I was trying to wrap my brain around all the letter descriptions. Meg is having a creative block and she convinces Reid to help her sort it out. I’m so glad I stuck it out though because it was such a good love story! They truly learn about themselves and discover each other. It’s a slow building relationship where they learn what makes each other tick. They’re both so different but it’s written so well you appreciate how they complement each other perfectly. I loved her reference to Reid as being very masterpiece theater. Since I like historical fiction, I got everyone one of the references and they cracked me up. I can completely visualize how Reid was acting. I was hooked in how they shared their lives with each other and their bond grew. This book had substance and a real story underneath that so many romances don’t have. It was so well written and I couldn’t put it down at the end. The beginning was a little abstract for me but I understand the purpose of it in defining Meg. LOVED this story and highly recommend it. Thank you to Kensington & NetGalley for the opportunity to read this book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jamie beauty_andthebook_

    4.5 stars! Love Lettering is a quiet kind of love story - the kind that starts slow and uncertain but will ultimately sneak up on you and catch you in the feels. Meg and Reid are an unlikely pair (probably partially attributed to the fact that she designed the wedding program for his now cancelled wedding) but their differences compliment one another beautifully in this story. Love Lettering is about finding yourself and someone who loves you for that, while navigating career paths and 4.5 stars! Love Lettering is a quiet kind of love story - the kind that starts slow and uncertain but will ultimately sneak up on you and catch you in the feels. Meg and Reid are an unlikely pair (probably partially attributed to the fact that she designed the wedding program for his now cancelled wedding) but their differences compliment one another beautifully in this story. Love Lettering is about finding yourself and someone who loves you for that, while navigating career paths and friendships that don't always make life an easy ride. For those who like a fast-paced steamy novel, this may not be the romance for you - but it grabbed a hold on me and didn't let go. There are one or two red hot scenes but this one is fairly tame in this regard! Thank you to Kensington Books for an advanced copy. All opinions are my own.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mirjana **DTR - Down to Read**

    I need this book in my eyeballs like yesterday!! In Kate Clayborn's newsletter, she described this book as "NYC-set romance featuring an Instagram-famous hand-letterer with a secret habit for hiding codes in her work and the handsome mathematician who finds her out." Ummmm, yeah....

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mlpmom (Book Reviewer)

    I only read an excerpt but it was really good!

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