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Sherlock Holmes: The Ultimate Collection

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Arthur Conan Doyle's master criminologist Sherlock Holmes continues to delight readers around the world more than a century after he first appeared in print (in 1887's A Study in Scarlet). The digital age has only increased his popularity: amid the onslaught of contemporary crime fiction there is something reassuring about the classic one volume set of the complete Arthur Conan Doyle's master criminologist Sherlock Holmes continues to delight readers around the world more than a century after he first appeared in print (in 1887's A Study in Scarlet). The digital age has only increased his popularity: amid the onslaught of contemporary crime fiction there is something reassuring about the classic one volume set of the complete Sherlock Holmes. In Sherlock Holmes: The Ultimate Collection you will find all four Sherlock Holmes novels - A Study In Scarlet, The Sign of the Four, The Hound of the Baskervilles, The Valley of Fear - as well as the short story collections The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, The Return of Sherlock Holmes and His Last Bow - Some Reminiscences of Sherlock Holmes.


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Arthur Conan Doyle's master criminologist Sherlock Holmes continues to delight readers around the world more than a century after he first appeared in print (in 1887's A Study in Scarlet). The digital age has only increased his popularity: amid the onslaught of contemporary crime fiction there is something reassuring about the classic one volume set of the complete Arthur Conan Doyle's master criminologist Sherlock Holmes continues to delight readers around the world more than a century after he first appeared in print (in 1887's A Study in Scarlet). The digital age has only increased his popularity: amid the onslaught of contemporary crime fiction there is something reassuring about the classic one volume set of the complete Sherlock Holmes. In Sherlock Holmes: The Ultimate Collection you will find all four Sherlock Holmes novels - A Study In Scarlet, The Sign of the Four, The Hound of the Baskervilles, The Valley of Fear - as well as the short story collections The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, The Return of Sherlock Holmes and His Last Bow - Some Reminiscences of Sherlock Holmes.

30 review for Sherlock Holmes: The Ultimate Collection

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sharon B.

    As a fan of the hit BBC series Sherlock starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman, I've enjoyed making my way through these classic stories. I'd read a few of them in school and such, but most of them are brand new to me. It's fun to see how the show's writers have adapted Conan Doyle's tales of our favorite consulting detective into a modern setting. Looking forward to reading the rest of these fun and compelling mysteries!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Will Hoover

    Remember to look closely at the cover of all these "complete" Sherlock Holmes books. With the wonders of capitalistically fueled competition, each edition of all 4 novels and 56 short stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is beginning to look more and more similar. Not all are created quite as equal as one would think, however. Sherlock Holmes: The Ultimate Collection is more than adequate if you just want to read every one of the stories, but it's definitely not the best of the bunch. Read on to Remember to look closely at the cover of all these "complete" Sherlock Holmes books. With the wonders of capitalistically fueled competition, each edition of all 4 novels and 56 short stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is beginning to look more and more similar. Not all are created quite as equal as one would think, however. Sherlock Holmes: The Ultimate Collection is more than adequate if you just want to read every one of the stories, but it's definitely not the best of the bunch. Read on to find out more. In my quest to find the holy grail of Sherlock Holmes literature, aka; THE definitive collection of original, Conan Doyle penned stories, I actually ended up buying (and reading and rereading) 3 different versions. My assessment of all 3 is as follows: 1 - Sherlock Holmes: The Ultimate Collection (the one being reviewed here) - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00D...) * This is a perfectly adequate collection. It DOES include all 4 novels and 56 short stories, but the book is all text, with no real illustrations to speak of. When I first purchased it as an ebook, it did NOT include all the stories, but before I was even finished reading it, a simple Kindle update added all the rest, making it certifiably "complete." So if you see a review of The Ultimate Collection that says it isn't complete, it's probably just an old review. At any rate, the "Film and Television Adaptations" and Beyond the Canon" synopsis sections at the end of the book are also included, but do not appear in the other Sherlock Holmes collections. Kindle formatting isn't so good in this one, however, unfortunately. Individual story/chapters aren't easily accessible from the drop down menu, as they are in other collected SH books. My five star rating is for the writing itself, which is of course, practically peerless. 2 - The Complete Sherlock Holmes: Volumes 1-4 (The Heirloom Collection) - http://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B0... * The Heirloom Collection isn't the absolute best compendium of SH stories, but it is extremely good. Most importantly, it does contain all 4 novels and 56 short stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, though not always in the exact same order as other editions -- making it a little confusing, when comparing different editions, to determine if all the stories are actually included (and they really are). Design wise, the graphic presentation (font choices, layout, etc) of this "heirloom edition" is superb -- making it clearly better in that regard than perhaps any of the "complete" Sherlock Holmes books currently available. The color illustrations aren't bad either, but there really aren't all that many for such a large book, filled with so many classic tales. Good Kindle formatting overall, but not as good as it could have been. 3 - The Complete Sherlock Holmes (Illustrated) (Top Five Classics Book 17) - http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=x... * The absolute best of the three, in my opinion. This Top Five Classics edition includes all 4 novels and 56 short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. Kindle formatting is superb, and best of all, most (if not all) of the classic illustrations that accompanied the original, first run publication of each story are included. Some short stories even have up to three separate illustrations! Pretty much all of the plates are reproduced in pencil/pen & ink drawn black and white, but the quality of the artwork is vastly superior to what appears in most other SH collections. So for my money, the Top Five Classics edition (#3) is hands down the very best one currently available. Wish I'd known that before I purchased all three, but none of these collections were much more than $3 to $6 each, and the Sherlock Holmes: The Ultimate Collection was only 99 cents! So if you don't care about illustrations, design quality, or good Kindle formatting, then you can certainly save a few bucks by choosing that particular version of the book (see #1 above). On a final note, The Adventure of the Cardboard Box IS included in the Top Five Classics book, but appears in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes novel, as opposed to other editions that include it in the collected short story novel, His Last Bow. It's a little confusing at first, with so many "adventures" to keep track of, but rest assured, the Cardboard Box and all the rest really ARE there. So the game's afoot, no matter which edition you choose, but personally, if I had to do it all over again, I'd probably just buy the Top Five Classics edition.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Belles

    60 stories and not one ounce of character development. Interesting cases but somewhat tedious to read them all.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Becky Baylous

    I feel like I have really accomplished something in finishing this entire collection! :) It was quite long but totally worth it. At first I wasn't sure that I was going to enjoy the person of Sherlock Holmes but as time went on that changed. It is really a story of a friendship between Holmes and Watson. It was so interesting to see how it evolved and changed. I thoroughly enjoyed this collection and highly recommend it. My son and I have been watching the Jeremy Brett version of the Sherlock I feel like I have really accomplished something in finishing this entire collection! :) It was quite long but totally worth it. At first I wasn't sure that I was going to enjoy the person of Sherlock Holmes but as time went on that changed. It is really a story of a friendship between Holmes and Watson. It was so interesting to see how it evolved and changed. I thoroughly enjoyed this collection and highly recommend it. My son and I have been watching the Jeremy Brett version of the Sherlock Holmes series on television. It is by far the best of all the ones I have seen and definitely the most accurate.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Diana H.

    What an amazing collection! I didn’t want it to end!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Interesting for historical insight I haven't finished the entire collection but I do have some insights that I need to jot down for myself. The stories showcase misogyny well beyond the lack of legal status and rights accorded women at the time. The working class characters are props and when occasionally one is fully developed, Doyle drops them off the page as if he doesn't know what to do with them. The non-English European if lacking a million pounds, a crown, a title or Scotland Yard level Interesting for historical insight I haven't finished the entire collection but I do have some insights that I need to jot down for myself. The stories showcase misogyny well beyond the lack of legal status and rights accorded women at the time. The working class characters are props and when occasionally one is fully developed, Doyle drops them off the page as if he doesn't know what to do with them. The non-English European if lacking a million pounds, a crown, a title or Scotland Yard level authority detective doesn't exist. It's not as bad as American science fiction with regards to non-Americans but it's very close. Across hundreds of pages there are four non-whites mentioned. One is an opium den bouncer, three are Sikh soldiers in a military? prison. So the racism quotient is not surprisingly very, very high. Doyle much like his Holmes and the lovable Dr. Watson are sociopaths. That's just my opinion. Please, no more hate comments. It won't change my feelings and it wouldn't reflect well on the sender. I first read the Holmes stories as a teenager and looking at it now, it's much different. I'm trying to avoid comparisons to others writers but Charlie N Holmberg and the "Magician" books remind me of the Holmes universe. I'm going to have to re-read Agatha Christie and see how that bounces around in my head. I don't remember the stories that deal with Americans. The one with the Mormons was shocking to me in the detail that he used in the description of Mormon lifestyle. He seems to use less when describing the British experience and it makes sense, since his readers would easily fill in the entire background of a story from a key few sentences. The story about the KKK caught me by surprise. While he throws in detail, he doesn't make a moral judgement about their agenda. He simply is concerned that they behave as a criminal organization and I get the impression that if the KKK members had been southern senators neither Holmes nor Doyle would have been concerned. Of course then they would not have killed anyone directly but he doesn't seem to realize that their agents were financed and protected by the same kind of people Holmes would go after who ordered a murder or theft in London. It's not surprising as I thought about it, that Europeans might know that the founder was confederate General Nathan Forrest. They were a domestic terrorist organization but Holmes is only concerned with their white victims and that was surprising. That he would devote so much energy to track down the murderer of former members, surprised me. I would have expected his attitude to be that some people have earned the right to be murdered. Instead he's upset that whites with influence are intimidated by these guys, as if any white with influence in the South (carpet bagger or not), clashed with their agenda. That's a total misunderstanding of the purpose, organization and funding of these creeps. I remember reading that Woodrow Wilson that forward thinking, visionary president was a Klan member. Washington DC hosted a national celebration of the Klan, parade included around the time of the first World War. This is a constant theme in the stories. He doesn't seek justice, only to solve puzzles. He pursues murderers who have finally balanced the scales of justice in a system that doesn't seek justice, only bodies for the hangman to reassure the proper sort that they are safe. It bothered me when I was younger, even though I focused on the puzzles but it jumped off the page this go round. The roles, rights and importance of women has changed since the stories were written but only as regards women of the "right sort". Holmes considers some males despicable, but then having solved the puzzle puts the women's situations out of mind. He consistently writes women, willingly following their kidnappers because they are too stupid to flag down a bobbie. A Greek heiress allows two low lifes to "drag" her onto a liner for London, later "drag" her to the Mainland and then to a Balkan capital before she apparently kills them. She only does it because they killed her brother in front of her. It may be an accurate reflection of women at the time but it's still insane. Holmes bounced around Europe all the time but not to "rescue" her. I was never thrilled by Sherlock's personality but I despise him now. I'll read the stories and may (though I doubt it) re-read some again for the puzzles. Most are really too gross to enjoy, because of his treatment of women regardless of class, his special contempt for women not of the right class, his contempt basically for any male without a title, a crown or high level government position, even the bankers are mocked. His writing isn't that great but some of the adventures are. The characters aren't as alive as those of Zen DiPietro or Ann Christy or Elizabeth Moon. His characters are just bland but Sherlock is a son of Scottish nobility, so that makes a difference, maybe. I won't bother with his other series.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tam May

    Even though I marked this as finished, I'll be honest - I stopped about 20% in. These tales are of course classics and Sherlock Holmes deserves his position as the most famous detective of all crime fiction. But I stopped reading for one reason - I discovered I do not like Sherlock Holmes. At all. It's not even his dryness that bothers me. It's his incredible condensation toward everyone, especially Watson (who is not the bumbling idiot that many of the films and TV series make him out to be - Even though I marked this as finished, I'll be honest - I stopped about 20% in. These tales are of course classics and Sherlock Holmes deserves his position as the most famous detective of all crime fiction. But I stopped reading for one reason - I discovered I do not like Sherlock Holmes. At all. It's not even his dryness that bothers me. It's his incredible condensation toward everyone, especially Watson (who is not the bumbling idiot that many of the films and TV series make him out to be - he just has a different approach to a crime). He is also a misogynist. It's not that he doesn't trust women, "not even the best of them". It's that he hates them, period. Think about it - who but a misogynist would take a man who is married (especially a newlywed) into his adventures without even a mention of the wife and a total disregard for his (Watson's, in this case domestic life? I also found most of the stories, quite frankly, a little simplistic. I'll take the more humane and colorful Hercule Poirot, thank you very much! 4 stars because it's Sherlock Holmes and you can't give Holmes less than 4 stars, can you?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Elice Mcneely

    Such a Rewarding Read I absolutely adore these writings. You cannot go wrong reading this: every single story of Sherlock Holmes. It's a shame there aren't authors that write like this nowadays. This entire collection was spot on and entertaining from the first word to the last. I feel like I'm saying goodbye to a wonderful friend now that I've finished reading it all. This is enjoyable for any age!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Stieffel

    I purchased this e-book as a supplement to the complete Holmes collection I already own in print. I travel a lot, and since this is my year for reading through all of Sherlock Holmes, I wanted a version on my iPad to save space in my carry-on. In this regard, the book worked just fine until I got to the end of my reading. The “ultimate” collection falls short of that name since it does not include the stories from _The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes_. This is no doubt due to the fact that the I purchased this e-book as a supplement to the complete Holmes collection I already own in print. I travel a lot, and since this is my year for reading through all of Sherlock Holmes, I wanted a version on my iPad to save space in my carry-on. In this regard, the book worked just fine until I got to the end of my reading. The “ultimate” collection falls short of that name since it does not include the stories from _The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes_. This is no doubt due to the fact that the Case-Book stories are still under copyright, so this is really not the Ultimate Collection but only the Public Domain Collection. It is illustrated, yes, but the reader would not be amiss in thinking at first that it isn’t, since all the images are at the back, not adjacent to the relevant stories. Some crucial illustrations are missing, such as the torn notes in "Reigate Puzzle," or the maps from those stories that originally had them, e.g., “The Priory School.” Most notably, "The Adventure of the Dancing Men" lacks the illustrations, which spoils half the fun of that story, which is seeing if one can break the code oneself. So this collection is better than having no Holmes e-books at all, but it really is only useful as an adjunct to a good print collection that's more fully illustrated. And that, y’know, actually includes all the stories.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mark Heath

    A good classic, worth a read

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Hapney

    This review was originally written for my blog at http://tjhapney.wordpress.com/ and is worded in that manner. If you read my about page you'll notice that I mention mysteries, which I don't often review as my taste in mysteries isn't always the same as others. However, it's hard to go wrong with Sherlock Holmes and as I was in between seasons of the UK TV show Sherlock I picked this up to get my fix so to speak. This was a great buy from Amazon at 99 cents for the Kindle and the stories are in This review was originally written for my blog at http://tjhapney.wordpress.com/ and is worded in that manner. If you read my about page you'll notice that I mention mysteries, which I don't often review as my taste in mysteries isn't always the same as others. However, it's hard to go wrong with Sherlock Holmes and as I was in between seasons of the UK TV show Sherlock I picked this up to get my fix so to speak. This was a great buy from Amazon at 99 cents for the Kindle and the stories are in order and aren't abridged, which I felt was important. I don't want to read a book or story after someone who feels they 'know better' has taken a whack at censorship. Apparently there is another collection on Amazon that has 56 short stories for a few dollars more, but I didn't see that one when I was out shopping around. On the whole, I was pretty happy with this purchase and really enjoyed reading it in between my sci-fi and fantasy books. I was a fan of the old Sherlock Holmes movies when I was young, but had not read the actual books or short stories. For the time they were written these stories really cover some pretty gutsy territory with regard to social issues. For anyone who enjoys mysteries and hasn't taken the time to read the stories, instead of watching movies like I did up until now, I think you will find a richness and depth that was not always present especially in the older versions of the movies. Anyway, lots more sci-fi and fantasy books on the schedule to be reviewed, but I thought I would share a review for this collection as I consider it to be a really good bargain and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Terry Cornell

    The first book I 'finished' reading in 2016. I actually started reading this last year--usually about a story a week. Some stories I remember reading in my youth, others totally unfamiliar. After reading it all, how can you help not thinking somewhat like Sherlock? Some stories more formula than others, some more mysterious than others, but they all end up solved. Such classic stories. This addition includes movies and television shows that have dealt with Holmes, as well as books and stories The first book I 'finished' reading in 2016. I actually started reading this last year--usually about a story a week. Some stories I remember reading in my youth, others totally unfamiliar. After reading it all, how can you help not thinking somewhat like Sherlock? Some stories more formula than others, some more mysterious than others, but they all end up solved. Such classic stories. This addition includes movies and television shows that have dealt with Holmes, as well as books and stories related to Holmes and Watson.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    After three long months, I've finally finished the complete collection of Sherlock Holmes (56 short stories, 4 novels). Some stories were clearly superior to others, but overall I enjoyed it. I'll miss Holmes a bit, so BBC better hurry up with its next season of Sherlock! I'll be analyzing it with new eyes after reading this collection.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Vivienne

    A Study in Scarlet - The Sign of The Four - The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes - The Memories of Sherlock Holmes - The Hound of The Baskervilles - The Return of Sherlock Holmes - The Valley of Fear - His Last Bow - The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes - A Study in Scarlet - ★★★★ The Sign of The Four - ★★★ The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes - ★★★★ The Memories of Sherlock Holmes - ★★★ The Hound of The Baskervilles - ★★★★★ The Return of Sherlock Holmes - ★★★ The Valley of Fear - ★★★★ His Last Bow - ★★★★★ The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes - ★★★

  15. 5 out of 5

    David

    Perfect and Complete It's all here, exactly as Doyle wrote it. Enjoy... The greatest detective of fiction in all his original glory. If you're new to the real Sherlock, it's time to catch up.

  16. 4 out of 5

    jacob hutchens

    I've read it cover to cover multiple times. Sherlock Holmes never gets old. It's a series that can be read over and over without getting repetitive. Having all the stories together is great.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jared

    I've read a good number of Sherlock Holmes' stories in my life but never, until now, have I read the entirety of Conan Doyle's works about the most famous of fictional detectives (4 novels and 56 stories). I found each story superbly crafted, and there's probably not much to be said in this review that hasn't been said better (and by someone with authority to make literary declamations) elsewhere. So I will dispense with the idea of a literary review of these works and content myself with some I've read a good number of Sherlock Holmes' stories in my life but never, until now, have I read the entirety of Conan Doyle's works about the most famous of fictional detectives (4 novels and 56 stories). I found each story superbly crafted, and there's probably not much to be said in this review that hasn't been said better (and by someone with authority to make literary declamations) elsewhere. So I will dispense with the idea of a literary review of these works and content myself with some comments on what I found to be the most compelling features of these stories. First, Conan Doyle used the affable Dr. Watson to great effect to "hide" the solution to each puzzle and create a dramatic reveal at the story's end. What was perhaps most interesting to me is that, I progressed through the stories, I found myself more and more following the clues and beginning to guess what turned out to be the mystery's solution. Now, in most detective stories, that is a terrible flaw in the story's design. However, it works to an interesting effect in the Holmes' canon because the reader who begins to follow Holmes' deductive reasoning ends up with an advantage over the story's narrator, Dr. Watson! Thus, the reader still feels satisfied even when the solution is guessed early on. I find that an exceedingly clever play on the narrator-reader relationship. The character of Holmes' himself to me has always been an icon of the "ideal modern man"...the one whose cool rationality, much like Spock's in an entirely different genre altogether, always asserts itself at the last minute to save the day. Here is a man who is "pure mind" and thus indomitable to his foes...even the great Professor Moriarty. Except Holmes is NOT that simple of a figure. Even if that is what he claims for himself, the Holmes that Watson paints for us is a more a man of IMAGINATION than intellect. The genius of Holmes is his ability to "embody" the criminals he pursues, imagine their motives, and thereby guess their essential moves. I would say Holmes is more ARTIST than SCIENTIST in these stories, especially given the lengths to which he goes to make each solution appear in as dramatic a way as possible. I'd never noticed the tremendous influence of these core Romantic ideals in the figure of Holmes until I took the time to work my way through the corpus. Conan Doyle is an enviable talent because of the evenness of the collection (both in quality and tone). His preface to "The Return of Sherlock Holmes" indicated to me an author who had grown tired of the character; so often, when that happens, the quality of craftsmanship begins to noticeably slip. Admirably, Conan Doyle added an additional 32 stories as well as the finest of the Holmes' novels (in my opinion), "The Hound of the Baskervilles," after reaching that point. For me, there was no discovery of "hidden gems" within the larger collection because each story is so like the most famous pieces (think here of the "Adventure of Silver Blaze" or "The Red-Headed League"). I suppose there's nothing particularly admirable or noteworthy about completing a feat such as this. Calling it a "feat" is also an overstatement of the case. But I can say this: it was a very satisfying venture. in Sherlock Holmes and John Watson, Conan Doyle has gifted to the literary world two wonderfully-drawn characters that have raised these works to the level of classic literature. And deservedly so.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jon R.

    I officially fell in love with Sherlock after watching the BBC series with Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman, which had become one of my favorite shows ever. I knew eventually I wanted to read the original material (all of it) so finding this amazing, complete collection as it was originally presented was just perfect and exactly what I had hoped for. Before reading this, I of course had also seen the Robert Downey Jr films as well, and I also played, and thoroughly enjoyed, the two very I officially fell in love with Sherlock after watching the BBC series with Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman, which had become one of my favorite shows ever. I knew eventually I wanted to read the original material (all of it) so finding this amazing, complete collection as it was originally presented was just perfect and exactly what I had hoped for. Before reading this, I of course had also seen the Robert Downey Jr films as well, and I also played, and thoroughly enjoyed, the two very well done video games developed by Frogwares (Crimes & Punishments/The Devil's Daughter) on console so I knew I was ready to take the plunge. I had a lot of fun reading. I love the idea of Sherlock and the importance of the premise of deduction. It can be applied to every day life and I was always one who needed to know the logic behind everything which could sometimes only be explained by thoughtful reasoning. Understanding what makes our world go round (or what goes round our world) always fascinated me. One of the things I most enjoyed was trying to guess the answer before Holmes would reveal it in his usual dramatic fashion. You get better as you read and become more familiar with his methods. I was proud to figure out the huge "who" early on in one story however not the entire "how" as only Sherlock knew the complete details. The character truly felt alive and authentic throughout the entire series. The writing was cleverly done from Watson's point of view, where it always kept you steps behind Sherlock - right where you should be. Doyle never wavered, nor did any novel or collection ever feel out of place when it concerned our main characters. That said, there are only two times I can recall where I felt both detached from the series and where it went on a bit longer than I think was necessary. It was the second half of the novels "Study In Pink" and "Valley of Fear" when the story would focus on characters involved after the fact in order to provide the back story. While I certainly appreciated the idea, those parts were more companion books than a continuation. They were just as long as the main story, albeit indeed interesting but you just yearned to get back to our main protagonists. As much as I enjoyed it all to the point I would have given 5 stars regardless I do have to make note of one significant criticism. I wish there was more of a connecting narrative between everything. Moriarty could have been it but he was very underused. Considering my first venture into Sherlock was the RDJ movies and then the BBC series before reading, imagine my surprise how little he appears in these works. I was under the impression he played a much larger role. While we did get a great introduction to Sherlock and Watson when they met which began it all, we did not get a legitimate defining conclusion in the same manner. I wanted that "final case" when Sherlock finally decided it was time to retire. That would have completed the narrative enough. All in all, a most pleasurable read all the same!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Angelien

    Reading these stories again, 19 years after I was first introduced to Sherlock Holmes, is like having a long conversation with an old friend. I decided to reread them after watching a few episodes of the Sherlock series on Netflix, and realized immediately that the show doesn't even compare to the brilliance of the books, at least for me. Holmes is such a compelling character that it's not surprising how often he's been reimagined and reinvented, but there's nothing quite like the original--he's Reading these stories again, 19 years after I was first introduced to Sherlock Holmes, is like having a long conversation with an old friend. I decided to reread them after watching a few episodes of the Sherlock series on Netflix, and realized immediately that the show doesn't even compare to the brilliance of the books, at least for me. Holmes is such a compelling character that it's not surprising how often he's been reimagined and reinvented, but there's nothing quite like the original--he's clever, complex, intelligent, and funny in such an understated way that you might miss half of it on a first reading. And poor, long-suffering Watson is a lovely narrator and voice of the audience. I really get a feel for him when Holmes is...ah... critiquing his writing. As a person who reacts viscerally to my reading material, to the point of talking back to it at times, it's hard not to roll my eyes, laugh, and call Holmes an ass when he's being particularly harsh. Ah, I've missed you, old chaps. Good to have you back.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Watsh

    Most used word - Singular Remarks by Sherlock Holmes - The game is afoot Watson! Quote i liked - Mediocrity knows nothing higher than itself, but talent instantly recognizes the genius. Sherlock Holmes books are still very captivating even at this time almost 100+ years since they were written. One can only wonder what a unique imagination Sir Arthur Conan Doyle had to have penned 56 short stories and 4 novels without failing to impress the readers and immortalizing the characters of these stories, Most used word - Singular Remarks by Sherlock Holmes - The game is afoot Watson! Quote i liked - Mediocrity knows nothing higher than itself, but talent instantly recognizes the genius. Sherlock Holmes books are still very captivating even at this time almost 100+ years since they were written. One can only wonder what a unique imagination Sir Arthur Conan Doyle had to have penned 56 short stories and 4 novels without failing to impress the readers and immortalizing the characters of these stories, be it Sherlock Holmes, Dr Watson, Professor Moriarty, Inspectors Lestrade, Gregson and numerous other characters. The prose is beautiful and transports the reader to the gothic London of 1800s where people come to seek help from the great amateur detective Mr Sherlock Holmes who lives at 221 B Baker Street. These stories are a must read for anyone interested in mystery fiction.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anna Sojourning

    I am sad -- devastated, rather -- that I have now read every single Sherlock Holmes book by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and that there are no more for me to read. Each and every story is brilliant and engrossing. The character of Sherlock Holmes is charming and likeable, and his close friendship with Dr. Watson is very endearing. Don't order this collection of books unless you have a lot of time on your hands; because once you pick it up, you won't want to put it down!

  22. 4 out of 5

    seema mathker

    Gripping Amazing..Can't put it down. Brilliant brain work. Each mystery is better than the other. Would recommend to everyone for an intellectual brainwash. Enjoyed every minute of reading. There can be only one Sherlock Holmes ever. Hats off to the author for his inimitable style of writing.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Allen W

    A must have What can you say? This collection is a must have. The canon. It’s the beginning of a wonderful, literary journey.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Beer

    I love Sherlock Holmes. This collection drops off in quality in the last section, but it is still a worthwhile engagement.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Devin

    Absolutely incredible. Consistent, masterful storytelling. It seems every mystery book/movie/show is somewhat derivative of the Arthur Conan Doyle's incredible work.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Grace

    I go back to these when I want a good read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Fair version Overall faithful to the Canon, but very disappointing to find that the Adventure of the Dancing Men... had no Dancing Men.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bo Reynolds

    Could not stop reading Every storyline was an amazing experience. Always wanted to spend more time with them. Traveling always moving around. England Germany all over.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Vasilyev

    Very good stories awakened the inner detective in me

  30. 5 out of 5

    Beverly Jo Butler

    Interesting reading Tales are well written and succinct, not overly dramatic. Suffering from insomnia I appreciate stories that can be read in on sitting.

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