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Lagom: The Swedish Art of Balanced Living

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Discover the Swedish ethos of balanced living with this little book of Lagom. The Swedish concept of Lagom (pronounced "lah-gom") roughly translates to "not too little, not too much, just right." This charming book introduces readers to a new way of balanced living that promises happiness and sustainability in work and in life. Lagom provides simple solutions to juggle Discover the Swedish ethos of balanced living with this little book of Lagom. The Swedish concept of Lagom (pronounced "lah-gom") roughly translates to "not too little, not too much, just right." This charming book introduces readers to a new way of balanced living that promises happiness and sustainability in work and in life. Lagom provides simple solutions to juggle everyday priorities, reduce stress, eat well, and save money, with lessons on the importance of downtime, being outdoors, and Sweden's coffee break culture. Tips on removing clutter and creating a capsule wardrobe help readers achieve Sweden's famously clean and functional design aesthetic, while advice on going green and growing food gets their hands dirty. With seemingly endless financial, emotional, and environmental benefits, Lagom presents an accessible and all-encompassing lifestyle that is sure to inspire mindfulness, wellbeing, and contentment.


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Discover the Swedish ethos of balanced living with this little book of Lagom. The Swedish concept of Lagom (pronounced "lah-gom") roughly translates to "not too little, not too much, just right." This charming book introduces readers to a new way of balanced living that promises happiness and sustainability in work and in life. Lagom provides simple solutions to juggle Discover the Swedish ethos of balanced living with this little book of Lagom. The Swedish concept of Lagom (pronounced "lah-gom") roughly translates to "not too little, not too much, just right." This charming book introduces readers to a new way of balanced living that promises happiness and sustainability in work and in life. Lagom provides simple solutions to juggle everyday priorities, reduce stress, eat well, and save money, with lessons on the importance of downtime, being outdoors, and Sweden's coffee break culture. Tips on removing clutter and creating a capsule wardrobe help readers achieve Sweden's famously clean and functional design aesthetic, while advice on going green and growing food gets their hands dirty. With seemingly endless financial, emotional, and environmental benefits, Lagom presents an accessible and all-encompassing lifestyle that is sure to inspire mindfulness, wellbeing, and contentment.

30 review for Lagom: The Swedish Art of Balanced Living

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

    *** There are two recently published books on lagom with not only similar titles, but they are also similar in size and cover design. My review of Lagom: Not Too Little, Not Too Much: The Swedish Art of Living a Balanced, Happy Life can be found here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... “Happiness in a sustainable sense is not about extremes.” (p 151) Lagom is about balance, having not too little, not too much, but just enough. Linnea Dunne not only defines lagom, but captures the very *** There are two recently published books on lagom with not only similar titles, but they are also similar in size and cover design. My review of Lagom: Not Too Little, Not Too Much: The Swedish Art of Living a Balanced, Happy Life can be found here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... “Happiness in a sustainable sense is not about extremes.” (p 151) Lagom is about balance, having not too little, not too much, but just enough. Linnea Dunne not only defines lagom, but captures the very essence of it in her writing on the subject. She offers up just enough information in this quick yet satisfying read. Dunne concisely conveys her thoughts and provides examples of applying the concept in your everyday life. Chapters cover work-life balance, food and drink, style, health and well-being, socializing, sustainable living, and attaining happiness. Nice references to lesser known Swedish cultural traditions, such as sportlov and lördagsgodis, are scattered throughout. Inspiring for those seeking a more balanced and contented lifestyle. Also recommended to those looking to learn more about Swedish culture and mindset.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kimber

    I never knew how well I would fit in with the Swedish but I found myself saying "I do this! I do this!" I even drive a Volvo, a car of practicality and quality over stylishness or trendyness. Much like Swedish philosophy. Work/life balance, sustainability, decluttering, second-hand shopping/frugality, love of fine coffee, Minimilism & living well over living large. This is all the fine Swedish art of balance. Lagom means "just the right amount" and not more..

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ash

    3.5 stars This book isn’t as good as the Hygge book but still parts of it were interesting. I wanted to read this only to learn about Swedes and how they lead a happy life. Also because of the amazing IKEA from Sweden. I really want to move to Europe after reading books like these - the quality of life seems to be so much better compared to the rat race that we are part of.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Young

    Interesting insights into Swedish society and values, expounding at length the philosophy of moderation in all things and citing many ways to embrace it in our own lives. Like last winter's books on the Danish concept of Hygge, the basic concept is a valid antidote to our over-indulgent, consumerist age, promoting a more eco-friendly and considered lifestyle. A few details struck me as oddly untraditional, e.g. the recommendation to make your main Friday night meal tacos and dips in front of the Interesting insights into Swedish society and values, expounding at length the philosophy of moderation in all things and citing many ways to embrace it in our own lives. Like last winter's books on the Danish concept of Hygge, the basic concept is a valid antidote to our over-indulgent, consumerist age, promoting a more eco-friendly and considered lifestyle. A few details struck me as oddly untraditional, e.g. the recommendation to make your main Friday night meal tacos and dips in front of the television (no, thank you). Beautifully produced and presented in hardback, it makes a nice gift book/coffee table book (I had my copy for Christmas), but I preferred the less showy and more in-depth analysis demonstrated in books like the excellent "A Year of Living Danishly". The production values were slightly marred by the unwise decision to print some pages in black text on a dark blue ground. People with less than perfect eyesight will struggle to read those sections. It was also a little repetitive, with multiple references to other pages throughout the book. The editor should have taken this as a clue to the need for a little further pruning. Not the author's fault, though. I don't know how old the author is, but the book read as if she were very young and didn't have a lot of life experience herself. Her enthusiasm for Swedish living was undermined by her confession that she'd emigrated to Dublin at the age of 19 and married an Irishman. Perhaps it is a case of absence making the heart grow fonder for her native land and more nostalgic - otherwise one wonders why she left what she paints as an idyll. Even so, worth a read - it's at a good price (much reduced on Amazon post-Xmas) and a quick read, and undemanding of time and brain-power.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Not a “profound” book by any means, but a clean-cut, tidy little book about happiness and healthy, mindful living that was a great pick-me-up in the middle of winter. I love a lot of the Swedish ideology this book promotes: taking time to be in nature, avoidance of consumerism and wastefulness, taking more time to be with friends and just BE with others...sounds like the Swedes might be doing some things right that ‘Merica’s got wrong if this book is any indication. Illustrations: I’m a sucker Not a “profound” book by any means, but a clean-cut, tidy little book about happiness and healthy, mindful living that was a great pick-me-up in the middle of winter. I love a lot of the Swedish ideology this book promotes: taking time to be in nature, avoidance of consumerism and wastefulness, taking more time to be with friends and just BE with others...sounds like the Swedes might be doing some things right that ‘Merica’s got wrong if this book is any indication. Illustrations: I’m a sucker for cheery illustrations and I love how the whole thing is filled with outdoor/food photography, folksy drawings and infographic-style formatting.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Pelin

    A bit overrated? The only thing that added value was the definition of the word lagom itself. All of the other information can be found in the brochures given in Swedish tourist information offices (which I remember doing). Recipe for cinnamon buns? Seriously (and that was in those brochures too). I would appreciate more research done on Swedish people than just WHO and UN facts.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    This book talks about the Swedish concept of lagom, or just enough, seeking balance, etc. It has a few pages of text on various aspects of lagom with photos and graphics, covering food, home, community, work, clothing, and discussion of sustainability. It was interesting to learn more about Swedish culture. The Swedes have a very admirable approach to work-life balance (parents receive generous time off until their children are age 8 - up to 480 days for mothers or fathers), they leave work on This book talks about the Swedish concept of lagom, or just enough, seeking balance, etc. It has a few pages of text on various aspects of lagom with photos and graphics, covering food, home, community, work, clothing, and discussion of sustainability. It was interesting to learn more about Swedish culture. The Swedes have a very admirable approach to work-life balance (parents receive generous time off until their children are age 8 - up to 480 days for mothers or fathers), they leave work on time, and take regular work coffee breaks (sometimes with complimentary cinnamon rolls!). I enjoyed reading about some of their traditions such as staying home and eating tacos on Friday nights while watching TV, and a more elaborate coffee tradition (fika) on Saturdays with treats. The Swedes love the outdoors and are committed to going green with extensive recycling programs (only 1% of household waste ends up in landfills). With a strong middle class and high ranking on the happiness index, the country is doing many thing right. I wish the book had gone into a little more detail about some things, and the clothing section especially talked a lot about Swedish brands (some parts were written by contributors), but overall this was an enjoyable read now that all things Scandinavian are popular.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Lagom, the name for Swedish balanced living can be described as aiming for "not too Little, not too much, just right" The emphasis in all parts of life, from consuming goods, preparing food, enjoying the outdoors, communing with nature and friends is on the good of the collective rather than on any one person or group. Sweden is known to be one of the top ten countries in the world with contented, happy people. The author Linnea Dunne answers the question, why would one adopt Lagom with the Lagom, the name for Swedish balanced living can be described as aiming for "not too Little, not too much, just right" The emphasis in all parts of life, from consuming goods, preparing food, enjoying the outdoors, communing with nature and friends is on the good of the collective rather than on any one person or group. Sweden is known to be one of the top ten countries in the world with contented, happy people. The author Linnea Dunne answers the question, why would one adopt Lagom with the answer, that with most people under stress from staring at screens, feeling overloaded with toxins and missing out on communing with friends and family, that the planet itself is screaming for balance. The most enjoyable and educational feature of this books is her presentation of terms for Swedish activities. Example include "Fredagsmys' or honoring downtime with loved ones, enjoying a "Fika" culture or sharing coffee and "Kanelbullar" or cinnamon buns; and "Pyttipanna" or creating a meal with all the leftovers in the fridge! This book is a delightful excursion to another culture where less is more!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jantine

    I love books like this, denial is impossible to maintain ;-)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    I've been a bit obsessive this year with Swedish/Danish living having read The Little Book of Hygge, The Little Book of Fika and now Lagom: The Swedish Art of Balanced Living. This one was a bit more robust than the latter two. According to Dunne, lagom roughly translates into "just enough". It's striking the balance of life and basically, enjoying things in moderation. It's really not rocket science- working enough to live not living to work, spending time with family and friends, I've been a bit obsessive this year with Swedish/Danish living having read The Little Book of Hygge, The Little Book of Fika and now Lagom: The Swedish Art of Balanced Living. This one was a bit more robust than the latter two. According to Dunne, lagom roughly translates into "just enough". It's striking the balance of life and basically, enjoying things in moderation. It's really not rocket science- working enough to live not living to work, spending time with family and friends, sustainability, choosing quality over quantity, choosing practicality and functionality, etc. but it is a nice reminder. Dunne covers everything from work-life balance to socializing to food to fashion and home decoration. Even though she admits that the book is based off generalizations, she does back up with statistics. I'm not sure if it's because she comes off more matter of fact and gives more plausible ways everyone can include a little lagom in their lives, but the narration comes off as less pretentious than The Little Book of Hygge did. Hoping to incorporate some of the ideas she gives in my own life.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I'd say 3.5 stars. One of the less twee Nordic lifestyle books I've encountered, but I probably should stop now. I think there are only so many times you can read about natural-fiber textiles, Jante's Law, high-quality universal healthcare, and mandatory paternity leave without wanting to tear your own eyes out. However, this is pretty cute. The pictures are nice, the illustrations are adorable, and the recipes seem good. People who are taking it as mad prescriptivist seem to be missing the I'd say 3.5 stars. One of the less twee Nordic lifestyle books I've encountered, but I probably should stop now. I think there are only so many times you can read about natural-fiber textiles, Jante's Law, high-quality universal healthcare, and mandatory paternity leave without wanting to tear your own eyes out. However, this is pretty cute. The pictures are nice, the illustrations are adorable, and the recipes seem good. People who are taking it as mad prescriptivist seem to be missing the point. (Seriously, y'all. They're telling you to not take life so seriously.) It's about balance in all things, and that might mean letting go of perfection to have a weekly veg-out night with your family in front of the TV and ready-meals, it might be about a walk or a coffee break with your coworkers, it might be about digging in the dirt in an allotment or garden. This is probably what those of us who live in a crumbling nightmare empire can aspire to: thinking of the "good life" not in terms of material gains, but more in a commitment to the present. Lord knows we don't have a future.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I was interested in reading about Lagom, as Hygge has been something that has really interested me this year and I wanted to learn about this concept as well. Because it was marketed the same way (cutesy small book), I assumed lagom and hygge were very similar. While they share similar concepts I think I vibe more with lagom, as it's all about practicality and balance, something I strive for (and frankly I think it's one of my Libra traits as well, haha). I'm glad I read this book around the end I was interested in reading about Lagom, as Hygge has been something that has really interested me this year and I wanted to learn about this concept as well. Because it was marketed the same way (cutesy small book), I assumed lagom and hygge were very similar. While they share similar concepts I think I vibe more with lagom, as it's all about practicality and balance, something I strive for (and frankly I think it's one of my Libra traits as well, haha). I'm glad I read this book around the end of 2017, because it's definitely given me ideas for 2018 and ways to update my life so to speak, so I can live a bit more simply and practically. I really enjoy a lot of the lagom concepts. While I won't be adapting all of them, since I'm very entrenched in my own Polish-American culture, many of the lagom concepts are useful and make perfect sense. I'm going to keep learning about lagom for sure now~

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tori

    Overall, 3.5. Physical aesthetics of the book: 5 stars, absolutely. A great, minimalist feel while the embossing and matte, sturdy cover give it weight in hand. Really love it. At the end, the author admits it’s a lightweight skimming of a deep concept and offers only a wee bit of practical advice for incorporating Lagom into the hectic, insatiable, and omnivorous melee that is American-style living... And while I loved it on the whole, it was all just too brief and almost terse (perhaps that is Overall, 3.5. Physical aesthetics of the book: 5 stars, absolutely. A great, minimalist feel while the embossing and matte, sturdy cover give it weight in hand. Really love it. At the end, the author admits it’s a lightweight skimming of a deep concept and offers only a wee bit of practical advice for incorporating Lagom into the hectic, insatiable, and omnivorous melee that is American-style living... And while I loved it on the whole, it was all just too brief and almost terse (perhaps that is the point? I feel like that is the point and yet I just don’t work that way!) If brevity is the soul of Lagom, I am already failing. Very sweet book though.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Timandra Whitecastle

    This is a quirky illustrated beautiful book that I’m going to give 4.5 stars. It’s main problem was that I read it just after finishing Meik Wiking‘s Hygge and Lykke books - and I simply liked them just a little bit more. Maybe the Danish book hangover colored my impression? So I wouldn’t give it the full 5 stars - I just didn’t love it as much - but I think it’s still a great book that embraces a certain moderate no-nonsense approach to life that really resonated with me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Taylor

    An interesting and enjoyable read I wasn't sure what to expect when I started reading this book; it really made me think about some of the changes I could make to make my like simpler and I love the focus on community (making your neighbour a batch of cinnamon buns - why not). I am interested in learning about other cultures so this was a great read for me.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bookwormandtheatremouse

    I am always fascinated by these books embracing different ways of living to improve our lives. This is another beautiful book that encourages you embrace Lagom - the Swedish way of living - it is fascinating read as you read the theory behind the practice and it shares ideas about how to be just enough 'Lagom'.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nikolina

    I must admit I picked it up solely for its "looks." It's a lovely book with beautiful illustrations. As for the content... I don't know what to think of it. The book could as well be named "The Swedes Are Perfect", which is ridiculous. Plus, the whole philosophy is nothing groundbreaking, most of us already live by those "rules." I gave it 3 stars mostly for the aesthetics.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ipek

    I found it too quick of a read with too much brand name dropping and no substance. I get that the suggestions are not viable for everyone everywhere but the tone of the book implies that the writer is unaware of that fact. Cute design and lovely illustrations. Maybe I would have enjoyed it more as a beach read where I am less likely to be cranky about basic lifestyle books.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Myrthe

    It was fun to read about the Swedish culture, but this book didn't really tell me anything I did not already know or do in real life. So, I'd recommend it for a story about life in Sweden (with horrible overgeneralisations - "the Swedish" do this) but not for teaching you something new about lifestyle.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lisastrawberry

    Friendly little book on the art of "not too little, not too much, just right" in all aspects of one's life I really enjoyed it and it fit well with the book I just read on hygge. :)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Peterman

    A charming look at what the Swedes do to create balanced, happy life. Lagom translates to "everything in moderation" and the book is divided into three sections - personal life, family & relationships and the wider world. I believe we learn the most by going outside our own culture as it gives us a wider range for what's possible. Swedish homes are simple, clutter-free yet have a personal touch via plants, lights, handmade or secondhand items. Shoes off in the house keeps things sanitary and A charming look at what the Swedes do to create balanced, happy life. Lagom translates to "everything in moderation" and the book is divided into three sections - personal life, family & relationships and the wider world. I believe we learn the most by going outside our own culture as it gives us a wider range for what's possible. Swedish homes are simple, clutter-free yet have a personal touch via plants, lights, handmade or secondhand items. Shoes off in the house keeps things sanitary and cozy. Sleep is fostered by subdued colors in the bedroom, layers of comfy linens, blinds that darken the room and a nice wind-down routine in the evening. A morning dip, saunas and time in nature make up the Swedish lifestyle. They also like to make exercise a part of their everyday life as compared to going to the gym. Many ride bikes or walk. A minimalistic wardrobe of eco-friendly fabrics and allowing imperfection to be okay is part of the balanced lifestyle. Work-Life balance begins with rising early and allowing breaks to be time away to connect with others. Niki compares her life in London where everyone stayed late to fit in at the office, whereas in Sweden they are productive but leave on time to make family a priority and down-time is valued. The Swedes are not quick to form relationships, they take their time to listen and get to know someone first. They value relationship equality, gender neutrality and simple ways to entertain guests in one's home or in nature. Parental leave offers 480 days to be shared amongst both parents and used up until the child is twelve. How cool is that? They aim to not have too many toys, to allow kids to be bored as a way to develop life skills that include imagination, forming relationships and understanding emotions. Thinking of others is common and demonstrated via volunteering, being kind, respecting nature and being eco-conscious. The Swedes eat in moderation and have some of the least amount of food-waste. Eating what you have on hand by making pyttipanna - "small pieces in a pan" a hodgepodge of leftovers including diced potatoes, meat scraps, onions and leftover veggies which are tossed together and then fried. Composting, gardening and growing veggies from scraps are additional ways to not waste. For me this book was a nice combination of many practices I see in Portland, Oregon. It's a good way to learn from the Swedes and enrich your own life!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Eleanor Slater

    A curious mix of information and opinion this book champions the idea of Goldilocksing your way through life - applying the "not too little, not too much" approach wherever possible. It talks about the importance of work-life balance, sustainable living, eating and socialising and how to achieve a sustainable form of happiness. As a fan of all things Swedish I really enjoyed this book, it spoke to the frugal, sensible half of me and encouraged me to try and be less consumerist - but it didn't A curious mix of information and opinion this book champions the idea of Goldilocksing your way through life - applying the "not too little, not too much" approach wherever possible. It talks about the importance of work-life balance, sustainable living, eating and socialising and how to achieve a sustainable form of happiness. As a fan of all things Swedish I really enjoyed this book, it spoke to the frugal, sensible half of me and encouraged me to try and be less consumerist - but it didn't really teach me how to quash that "buy now, regret it later" side of my personality which so often dominates. I guess I'll have to work that one out for myself, but if you want a snapshot into the Swedish mindset and to be inspired to try a different, less selfish approach to life then this book ticks all the boxes.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amina Mirsakiyeva

    Lagom is a Swedish term for "golden middle". In this short book author describes the basis of Swedish happiness which could be reached by taking things easy, being responsible, responsive and mindful. Author shares simple food receipts, details of daily traditions, basic rules of being ecological and sportive. Books is full of Swedish terms which does not have analogues in other languages, but which characterize Swedish society a lot (fredagsmys, lattepappor, fika, friluftsliv, etc). As person Lagom is a Swedish term for "golden middle". In this short book author describes the basis of Swedish happiness which could be reached by taking things easy, being responsible, responsive and mindful. Author shares simple food receipts, details of daily traditions, basic rules of being ecological and sportive. Books is full of Swedish terms which does not have analogues in other languages, but which characterize Swedish society a lot (fredagsmys, lattepappor, fika, friluftsliv, etc). As person who lives in Sweden for 6 years, I realized that many things described in the book are already implemented in my life. However, for someone outside Sweden this book could be good introduction of Swedish culture and lifestyle. I would recommend this book for all newcomers to Sweden and all fans of this amazing country.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christa Van

    Another example from the countries of how to live your best life. This from Sweden, lagom roughly translates into "just the right amount." In other words don't overdo things or under do things to achieve a balance that will make you happier in the long term. This book advocates for balance, simplicity and moderation. Topics covered in this book include work-life balance, food and drink, health, friends, the planet and the management of "things." Swedish design is well know for simple lines and Another example from the countries of how to live your best life. This from Sweden, lagom roughly translates into "just the right amount." In other words don't overdo things or under do things to achieve a balance that will make you happier in the long term. This book advocates for balance, simplicity and moderation. Topics covered in this book include work-life balance, food and drink, health, friends, the planet and the management of "things." Swedish design is well know for simple lines and not exactly "minimalism" but less is more. I like the idea of Friday night relaxation. I like the idea of keeping it all together and doing what you can but not more than you can. I see that there are at least 2 other new books about this same topic. Not sure that I need to read another one but the ideas here seem reasonable.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shellie

    I enjoyed this little book. The basic message is that happiness and well-being can be found in moderation, or “lagom”, as the Swedes call it. I found myself agreeing with most of the book’s points, that fresh air, recycling, gathering with friends and family, taking more time for hobbies etc... all increase well-being and contentedness. As one who is constantly fighting against my extremist nature it will not be easy nor perhaps possible to live this way but it is nice to read about. My favorite I enjoyed this little book. The basic message is that happiness and well-being can be found in moderation, or “lagom”, as the Swedes call it. I found myself agreeing with most of the book’s points, that fresh air, recycling, gathering with friends and family, taking more time for hobbies etc... all increase well-being and contentedness. As one who is constantly fighting against my extremist nature it will not be easy nor perhaps possible to live this way but it is nice to read about. My favorite message was that Swedes don’t get excessively worked up about any emotion. Being sad or upset is not a big deal, they know it will pass and give way to another emotion. I could definitely use that in my day to day life.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    So, what is lagom and how different is it to hygge? The phrase ‘not too little, not too much, but just enough’ seems the best to describe this Swedish word. Here the emphasis lies on ‘just enough’ and ‘moderation’ and this appears to be the main Swedish tweak on the otherwise similar concept of hygge. In 'Lagom: The Swedish Art of Balanced Living', Linnea Dunne, a Swedish writer now living in Dublin, Ireland, writes about work-life balance and environmentally conscious living, both aspects of a So, what is lagom and how different is it to hygge? The phrase ‘not too little, not too much, but just enough’ seems the best to describe this Swedish word. Here the emphasis lies on ‘just enough’ and ‘moderation’ and this appears to be the main Swedish tweak on the otherwise similar concept of hygge. In 'Lagom: The Swedish Art of Balanced Living', Linnea Dunne, a Swedish writer now living in Dublin, Ireland, writes about work-life balance and environmentally conscious living, both aspects of a lagom lifestyle. She shares tips on how to achieve it, as well as a few recipes ideal for the famous fika (coffee break the Swedish way).

  27. 4 out of 5

    Érica

    Beautiful cover and beautiful content. This was the first time I read about Lagom and I like to think that I've understood it - but for that, I must try and put it in practice. What I most cherished about this volume: the mouth-watering recipes (oh so many!), the lovely illustrations to go with the chapters, the aspects said chapters covered; I enjoyed them all, but found chapter 5 particularly insightful and chapter 3 was very amusing. The least good thing about it was that, at times, the text Beautiful cover and beautiful content. This was the first time I read about Lagom and I like to think that I've understood it - but for that, I must try and put it in practice. What I most cherished about this volume: the mouth-watering recipes (oh so many!), the lovely illustrations to go with the chapters, the aspects said chapters covered; I enjoyed them all, but found chapter 5 particularly insightful and chapter 3 was very amusing. The least good thing about it was that, at times, the text felt a little bit repetitive. But to be fair, the author did a great job of summing up the essence of Lagom in the final pages, leading us back to the real world with a few bonus tips.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Oliver Grin

    I read this book cover-to-cover in just about one day (it’s a quick read). The next day I picked it up again, started with the last chapter, and reread the whole thing backwards. ‘Lagom’ is a word which cannot be succinctly or holistically translated into English, and it deals with a concept which resides within extremes; things which are just right, just enough, just. Maybe this is why I had to read the book twice. Not because it was poorly written or overly complicated, but because I didn’t I read this book cover-to-cover in just about one day (it’s a quick read). The next day I picked it up again, started with the last chapter, and reread the whole thing backwards. ‘Lagom’ is a word which cannot be succinctly or holistically translated into English, and it deals with a concept which resides within extremes; things which are just right, just enough, just. Maybe this is why I had to read the book twice. Not because it was poorly written or overly complicated, but because I didn’t feel that I came away with a real understanding of lagom after my first read. Honestly, I think I’m still trying to wrap my head around it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Renee Dougherty

    Quick and fun lifestyle book extolling the virtues of a Swedish mindset. My only complaint is the layout. While the images and photos are beautiful, often the text is set into a box with background color making it difficult to read. In a nutshell, lagom is the middle way, not too little and not too much. Take responsibility for your environment and your neighborhood. Seek work-life balance by leaving the office on time. Strive for comfort and appropriateness in clothing rather than fashion. Quick and fun lifestyle book extolling the virtues of a Swedish mindset. My only complaint is the layout. While the images and photos are beautiful, often the text is set into a box with background color making it difficult to read. In a nutshell, lagom is the middle way, not too little and not too much. Take responsibility for your environment and your neighborhood. Seek work-life balance by leaving the office on time. Strive for comfort and appropriateness in clothing rather than fashion. De-clutter your home to reduce stress and add Scandinavian style. Eat seasonally and lower on the food chain.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    This was a really refreshing read to find out what Sweden does to approach the idea of having a balanced life. I really enjoyed learning some interesting things about the country in a variety of different areas: food, recycling, simplicity, being neighborly, and even vegging. It was a really interesting read. Some of the ideas would be almost borderline "radical" here in the United States but I wonder if we really shouldn't give some of them consideration. You'll find a great deal of useful This was a really refreshing read to find out what Sweden does to approach the idea of having a balanced life. I really enjoyed learning some interesting things about the country in a variety of different areas: food, recycling, simplicity, being neighborly, and even vegging. It was a really interesting read. Some of the ideas would be almost borderline "radical" here in the United States but I wonder if we really shouldn't give some of them consideration. You'll find a great deal of useful information here at how the Swedish people approach the concept of happiness and balance. I even came away with a few ideas I'm willing to try at home.

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