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Mayan Civilization: A History From Beginning to End

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Mayan History Making sense of our universe...It's an age-old practice that transcends cultures and generations. From our vantage point, the larger than life Maya civilization grappled with the urge in a grand scale. Join us as we take a voyage to understand the ways of the Maya. Inside you will read about... Who Made Contact? Early Explorers and their Impact How the Mayan History Making sense of our universe...It's an age-old practice that transcends cultures and generations. From our vantage point, the larger than life Maya civilization grappled with the urge in a grand scale. Join us as we take a voyage to understand the ways of the Maya. Inside you will read about... ✓ Who Made Contact? Early Explorers and their Impact ✓ How the Maya Wanted to Be Represented - History Written by the Victors ✓ Different Periods of Maya History ✓ Larger Than Life ✓ New Findings We'll learn what they held as sacred, how the sacred manifested itself in their lives, and about efforts to accurately portray them, despite romanticized versions. This eBook provides a deeper look at their pre-Columbian battling dynasties and their highly-structured approach to religion, science and society, as we explore their glories and misfortunes.


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Mayan History Making sense of our universe...It's an age-old practice that transcends cultures and generations. From our vantage point, the larger than life Maya civilization grappled with the urge in a grand scale. Join us as we take a voyage to understand the ways of the Maya. Inside you will read about... Who Made Contact? Early Explorers and their Impact How the Mayan History Making sense of our universe...It's an age-old practice that transcends cultures and generations. From our vantage point, the larger than life Maya civilization grappled with the urge in a grand scale. Join us as we take a voyage to understand the ways of the Maya. Inside you will read about... ✓ Who Made Contact? Early Explorers and their Impact ✓ How the Maya Wanted to Be Represented - History Written by the Victors ✓ Different Periods of Maya History ✓ Larger Than Life ✓ New Findings We'll learn what they held as sacred, how the sacred manifested itself in their lives, and about efforts to accurately portray them, despite romanticized versions. This eBook provides a deeper look at their pre-Columbian battling dynasties and their highly-structured approach to religion, science and society, as we explore their glories and misfortunes.

30 review for Mayan Civilization: A History From Beginning to End

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    This was an introduction into the Mayan civilization. It was short, and didn't go into that much detail, but I thought it was a good beginning and the author told the reader about further reading on the subject and where to find it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie (Bookfever)

    The Mayan civilization is one of my favorite things to read about. I've always been super intrigued by the Maya and their whole society. So it's not a surprise that I ended up really enjoying this book. This was a really great book if you want to learn more about the Mayan civilization. It was informative and with 61 pages it can be read so fast. The new findings especially were very interesting to me. I also loved learning about the connection with Charles Lindbergh and Edgar Allan Poe. I didn't The Mayan civilization is one of my favorite things to read about. I've always been super intrigued by the Maya and their whole society. So it's not a surprise that I ended up really enjoying this book. This was a really great book if you want to learn more about the Mayan civilization. It was informative and with 61 pages it can be read so fast. The new findings especially were very interesting to me. I also loved learning about the connection with Charles Lindbergh and Edgar Allan Poe. I didn't know that before this book. There's also so much more to learn about the Maya. If the invaders hadn't destroyed so many Mayan artifacts we'd know and understand their culture so much more. But new discoveries can always be made, of course. We can only hope. Overall, Mayan Civilization: A History From Beginning to End was another great Hourly History book that I enjoyed immensely. As usual with these books, I would highly recommend this one as well.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Abhijeet Jain

    Want to know how much shitty a book can be? Try this! Ancient civilizations always interest me. I love knowing about the past and I guess everyone loves it. Obviously, I was excited to read this, but all I found in this book was mini boring history book full of dates and other irrelevant stuff! (my academic history book is umpteenth times more interesting than this! ) The only things you can learn from this book are: Mayans knew about cocoa. Spanish missionaries destroyed the majority of Mayan Want to know how much shitty a book can be? Try this! Ancient civilizations always interest me. I love knowing about the past and I guess everyone loves it. Obviously, I was excited to read this, but all I found in this book was mini boring history book full of dates and other irrelevant stuff! (my academic history book is umpteenth times more interesting than this! ) The only things you can learn from this book are: Mayans knew about cocoa. Spanish missionaries destroyed the majority of Mayan historical records. Maya civilization used to do trade with Olmecs (another ancient civilization) That’s all! Seriously! The author of the book did no editing whatsoever! It seems like all he did was to copy paste newspaper clippings! It would have been far better if the author had mentioned whatever we know about Mayans in a chapter & had dedicated other chapters to mentioning dates, archaeologists etc. It would have been far better if the author had mentioned whatever we know about Mayans in a chapter & had dedicated other chapters to mentioning dates, archaeologists etc. I never thought that a book on Maya civilization could be this boring. Now I understand why this book is available for free on kindle. (the author did no effort in writing it & got marketing for his other paid books of hourly history series for free) ----------------------------------- Please use the comment section to warn me & other fellow bloggers of other shitty books out there! Have a nice day ahead

  4. 4 out of 5

    Roopkumar Balachandran

    Less information about the Maya's. The book is good at getting basics about the birth of this civilization. Not much is given about the kings also.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Abhyudaya Shrivastava

    A quick short read. Good to develop perspective on the Maya people and their ways.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anirudh Parthasarathy

    This is a review of the book on Mayan Civilization released by Hourly History. Many would have heard of them because of their calendar by which there was a widespread belief that the world would end by the end of 2012 (there was even a movie with the same theme) for the Mayan calendar did not have beyond December, 2012. Some others, including myself, would have heard of them because of Age of Empires. For the rest, the Mayans were an ancient civilisation who inhabited much of the modern day This is a review of the book on Mayan Civilization released by Hourly History. Many would have heard of them because of their calendar by which there was a widespread belief that the world would end by the end of 2012 (there was even a movie with the same theme) for the Mayan calendar did not have beyond December, 2012. Some others, including myself, would have heard of them because of Age of Empires. For the rest, the Mayans were an ancient civilisation who inhabited much of the modern day Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala and parts of Southern Mexico (north of which, I believe were the Aztecs). They are known for the complex pyramids and other structures that they constructed; the most notable being the Chichen Itza; a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Apart from that, they are also noted for the sophisticated cities they built and their contributions to astronomy and number system. The book touched upon all these aspects; starting with the origins of the civilisation and how they lived along with the other Mesoamerican civilisations. It then moved on to their first contact with Europeans (expeditions of Columbus) and eventually, the eventual conquest by Hernan Cortez. It also focused on the various traditions and how their rituals played a key part in maintaining order, be it in daily life or securing alliances or running a kingdom. The book also dispelled notions that the Mayans were a homogenous group of people and in fact, had various city states and internal strife and also the fact that war and human sacrifice (usually of the defeated) was critical to please their gods. It concluded with the attempts being made by present day North Americans to revive their traditions and form a hybrid Christian – Mayan culture. I felt the book gave an excellent insight into the history but then, I also felt that it touched upon personalities who built the civilisations very little; for instance, when talking about Aztecs, one could immediately visualise Montezuma or Chuahtemoc and similarly, if there was some focus on Mayan personalities of the past, the book could have been better. On the whole, I would award the book a four.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mark Laufenberg

    I've read a number of these Hourly History books and this is probably the first one that I didn't particularly enjoy reading. There didn't seem to be a lot of definitive information, but that's not the author's fault. There wasn't a whole lot to go on since the Spanish conquistadors and missionaries destroyed almost all of the manuscripts that the Maya had kept regarding their history. That, along with enslaving native people, plundering the gold of the area and spreading fatal diseases among I've read a number of these Hourly History books and this is probably the first one that I didn't particularly enjoy reading. There didn't seem to be a lot of definitive information, but that's not the author's fault. There wasn't a whole lot to go on since the Spanish conquistadors and missionaries destroyed almost all of the manuscripts that the Maya had kept regarding their history. That, along with enslaving native people, plundering the gold of the area and spreading fatal diseases among natives seems to be about all they were good for. I thought that the author spent a lot of time getting wrapped up in the debates and assumptions of how the Maya lived, what their culture was and their philosophy of the world. Nothing wrong with sharing his opinions on the subjects; I just thought it carried on a bit long and became kind of boring regarding subjects that can only be speculated on due to a lack of concrete evidence. I was hoping to read more detailed information about their temples, pyramids and other engineering innovations that have been discovered, but found the book lacking in that respect.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Vishal Shah

    I've studied the Aztec and Mayan History in primary & secondary Schools. This book looks at the day to day chores and how they lived, worshipped, traded including meeting Christopher Columbus and showing him what every child in the world drinks as hot chocolate as well as how they used chocolate for medicinal uses as well. To the point of being raided by the Spanish Solider lead by Hernan Cortes

  9. 4 out of 5

    Fernando Castellano

    Very interesting! As an immigrant in Mexico I was looking for the history of their culture and this book provides a great view of it. I recommend it. It's updated and is perfect to start the journey into the Maya history.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Barnes

    Wow This is a good subsidiary for this civilization to help breach holes left by the American Education System. Definitely recommend

  11. 5 out of 5

    Thom Swennes

    To my chagrin, I must admit to knowing next to nothing about ancient South and Middle American history. In this state of almost total ignorance, anything I could glean from this short publication would be a plus. I was fascinated to discover that, almost completely isolated from the rest of the world; the Mayans built structures, constructed complicated calendars, and made significant studies of the heavenly bodies. For being so isolated, the Mayan civilization was remarkably advanced. In 1492 To my chagrin, I must admit to knowing next to nothing about ancient South and Middle American history. In this state of almost total ignorance, anything I could glean from this short publication would be a plus. I was fascinated to discover that, almost completely isolated from the rest of the world; the Mayans built structures, constructed complicated calendars, and made significant studies of the heavenly bodies. For being so isolated, the Mayan civilization was remarkably advanced. In 1492 Christopher Columbus made his monumental discovery of the New World. The Mayan culture began a decline in the tenth and eleventh centuries but when Columbus first set foot on Mayan territory on July 30, 1502, his initial introduction was far from auspicious. This would mark the beginning of the end to a civilization and culture that had lasted for more than a thousand years. The Mayans and the Aztecs lived in relatively close proximity to each other but even with a consorted effort, they were unable to defeat the Spanish invaders and both eventually succumbed to the inevitable. It is impossible to condense a history spanning so many centuries into a narrative of fewer than fifty pages. It does highlight certain aspects of the culture and contains enough information to spawn an interest in discovering more. Many contemporary works are sighted to aid in a more in-depth and comprehensive study of the Mayan civilization, beliefs, and social structure. I have always been drawn to history but growing up in Texas; I always regarded the histories of Mexico and Central America too close to home to generate any real interest. Since my migration to Europe, the tables have turned and the Mayan and Aztec civilizations now breed much more significance.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Silas

    This was a reasonably good short introduction to several topics in Mayan history. It only briefly touches on all topics of Mayan culture, religion, or history, but does give a decent timeline for when the culture developed. The book was a little bit unfocused, and the brevity meant there wasn't a lot of detail, but it did emphasize that despite the currently popular belief that the Mayans had a particular closeness to nature, they still had problems with failing soils, a growing elite class that This was a reasonably good short introduction to several topics in Mayan history. It only briefly touches on all topics of Mayan culture, religion, or history, but does give a decent timeline for when the culture developed. The book was a little bit unfocused, and the brevity meant there wasn't a lot of detail, but it did emphasize that despite the currently popular belief that the Mayans had a particular closeness to nature, they still had problems with failing soils, a growing elite class that used up resources, and a tendency to solve problems by going to war. It puts the culture in context as just another human culture, and rather similar to its contemporaries, but also gave me a better idea about how the Mayan culture related to surrounding Mesoamerican cultures, as well. This was only 61 pages, so it isn't a complete history, but it was a good way to get started reading more.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Avani Joshi

    Good Consolidation of available knowledge. There is a great deal of efforts taken to gather pieces of information known about the Maya. There are some points I would like to add from a personal point of view - The construction of sentences is difficult to understand at times and had to read some parts multiple times to get the actual meaning. There has been frequent use of long sentences which disturbs the reading flow. I appreciate that the book gave a good insight in a few number of pages, albeit Good Consolidation of available knowledge. There is a great deal of efforts taken to gather pieces of information known about the Maya. There are some points I would like to add from a personal point of view - The construction of sentences is difficult to understand at times and had to read some parts multiple times to get the actual meaning. There has been frequent use of long sentences which disturbs the reading flow. I appreciate that the book gave a good insight in a few number of pages, albeit the reading experience can be enhanced. These are personal viewpoints and might also be a result of not having read much in this genre, still, might give it a thought.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Richard Brylczyk

    This book reads as if it were written in 2012. It fails to mention that the latest innovation in Mayan studies is the use of LIDAR to find hitherto hidden Mayan settlements. It should be updated to include this and other advancements in Mayan studies. The information provided is interesting but the inclusion of full titles and authors of reference material is an intrusion on your train of thought as you read the text. Using footnotes wou7ld have been preferable. Despite those faults, I ded learn This book reads as if it were written in 2012. It fails to mention that the latest innovation in Mayan studies is the use of LIDAR to find hitherto hidden Mayan settlements. It should be updated to include this and other advancements in Mayan studies. The information provided is interesting but the inclusion of full titles and authors of reference material is an intrusion on your train of thought as you read the text. Using footnotes wou7ld have been preferable. Despite those faults, I ded learn a few things about the Mayans that I had not come cross in my readings before.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Terri Gostola

    It is like someone slapped this together using cut and paste, and did it sloppily because some of the paragraphs repeat. For example, look at the page before the chapter, Conclusion. Notice how the middle of one overlong paragraph then repeats again as a second paragraph directly below. I don't think anyone even read this over after it was written. The sentences meander and are often very hard to understand. I am giving this two stars because there is some information about Mayan culture there It is like someone slapped this together using cut and paste, and did it sloppily because some of the paragraphs repeat. For example, look at the page before the chapter, Conclusion. Notice how the middle of one overlong paragraph then repeats again as a second paragraph directly below. I don't think anyone even read this over after it was written. The sentences meander and are often very hard to understand. I am giving this two stars because there is some information about Mayan culture there is you want to pick through the rubble.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Julian Orozco, Jr.

    Great reading Excellent read. Learned more about the Mayan civilizations and their cultures. Took me back to the Mayan tribes and their customs, religions, agriculture, hierarchy, and their trade and war dealings amongst other Mayan tribes. From the expansion and decline of the Maya, this book is a must for your book shelf.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    I've read a few of these short Hourly History books now, and this is probably my least favorite. There was some decent information, but overall I still feel quite ignorant about Mayan Civilization. The writer's voice is very weak and reminds me of my terrible essays back in college, and it's in serious need of a good editor. This one can be skipped.

  18. 5 out of 5

    DOUGLAS J BERRY

    I would like to take a class in Mesoamerica. The new technology will help to find new archeological sites. I wonder if we will ever have a complete registry of Mesoamerican deities. I occasionally run role playing games and wish it was possible to understand these people better.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sunilkumar KR

    Nice outline of the civilisation. This book deserves atleast 4 stars. It is a good collection of data from various sources. Lines citing other books and works is useful for further deep study. People who want to get a gust of Mayans, this book is for you.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gian Andrea

    In line with the other books from this Collection, nothing more, nothing less. It gives a brief, quick introduction to one of the most famous and relevant pre-Columbian civilizations without going to much into detail. A perfect read while commuting.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Richard Myers

    Excellent book A very good book on the Maya and their civilization. I learned many things that were not taught in school about their social groups, architecture, farming etc. A good book for anyone interested in the Mayan culture.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Antonio Erviti

    The Maya I've never studies the Mata and I thought this was a nice introduction to the history of a fascinating culture.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Vinayak B H

    The book dealt briefly on life Maya lives. I was more interested the predictions during their era. It good book to read

  24. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This wasn't worth my 30 minutes, unfortunately.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Emma Que

    Intriguing A very brief and interesting discussion of Mayan history that raises as many questions as it answered. I enjoyed it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Vishal Mehta

    I don't feel satisfied! I still feel ignorant about the Mayan civilisation.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan R Kirk

    Quick read Amazing book with lots of valuable information. I read this on the beaches of riviera maya and was engrossed in it every morning.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessi Madrid

    Good information, very very tiny book. Was bummed with how short the book was.

  29. 4 out of 5

    James Currin

    Interesting and informative - short, but this is as long as I wanted to read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Debolina Bhattacharya

    Way too short. Not detailed enough but okay for beginners.

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