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Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG

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You're no hero. You're an adventurer: a reaver, a cutpurse, a heathen-slayer, a tight-lipped warlock guarding long-dead secrets. You seek gold and glory, winning it with sword and spell, caked in the blood and filth of the weak, the dark, the demons, and the vanquished. There are treasures to be won deep underneath, and you shall have them.


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You're no hero. You're an adventurer: a reaver, a cutpurse, a heathen-slayer, a tight-lipped warlock guarding long-dead secrets. You seek gold and glory, winning it with sword and spell, caked in the blood and filth of the weak, the dark, the demons, and the vanquished. There are treasures to be won deep underneath, and you shall have them.

30 review for Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG

  1. 4 out of 5

    GrilledCheeseSamurai (Scott)

    So, I GM a Homebrew world for my players and I. We use the D&D 5th edition ruleset as the backbone for the mechanics of our game. However, I have some Pathfinder material in there, some Cypher system in there, some Dungeon World in there, and yes, a whole lot of Dungeon Crawl Classics in there ( and a whole shwack of other stuffs). That's the beauty of tabletop RPG games. You can pretty much do whatever the hell you want. The key is to stay consistent. If I say that 'this is how we do So, I GM a Homebrew world for my players and I. We use the D&D 5th edition ruleset as the backbone for the mechanics of our game. However, I have some Pathfinder material in there, some Cypher system in there, some Dungeon World in there, and yes, a whole lot of Dungeon Crawl Classics in there ( and a whole shwack of other stuffs). That's the beauty of tabletop RPG games. You can pretty much do whatever the hell you want. The key is to stay consistent. If I say that 'this is how we do something,' I have to make sure that the next time we do that thing again, the rules stay the same. If you have all that chalked out properly then you can snag material from whatever sources you want and make them your own. The world that I have created that myself and my players adventure in is called, Aventyra. And even though, when asked, I say that it is a D&D 5th edition game, really, it is a melting pot of all kinds of mechanics I have picked up from all over the place over the years. Dungeon Crawl Classics is a huge inspiration for me. This book is friggin gorgeous and, without any kind of exaggeration, I can honestly say that every single time I open this book I find something awesome and new. Whether it be something that inspires me, or a new ruleset that I think is cool, or just a particular piece of art that gets my juices flowing, there is always something in this damned book that blows my mind. It's a juggernaut of a book too. 470 pages packed between its hardcovers. Hell, just looking at the book sitting on my bookshelf makes me feel all gooey and excited. And the magic system...holy balls is it ever cool. It is easily the coolest magic system I have ever come across in my years of RPGing. I have slowly been incorporating the way magic works in this book into our own world and the 5th edition ruleset that my players and I use. It really adds a sense of danger and impact to the game that I haven't really ever seen in any other ruleset before. Magic has consequences and the risk/rewards of using Dungeon Crawl classics in my fifth edition games has really made it exciting for all of us involved. Bottom line? If you are a tabletop gamer and you see this book sitting on a shelf somewhere...you buy that motherfucker! Buy it with complete confidence that even if you don't play DCC games - you are gonna find stuff inside that will blow your mind and make yourself a better player or GM. That's a promise!

  2. 4 out of 5

    ik.ben.henri

    This is an extremely interesting rpg. Even if you don’t plan to play this, because it has very interesting concepts for every OGL d20 fantasy rpg. The first difference you’ll will notice, is the level 0 characters. They call this the CHARACTER CREATION FUNNEL. Every player rolls 3D6 for their abilities, and create 3 level 0 pc’s. They have no further classes, nor race bonuses, no modifiers, etc etc. Their hp is only a 1d4+stamina modifier. Their occupation and possessions are randomized with a This is an extremely interesting rpg. Even if you don’t plan to play this, because it has very interesting concepts for every OGL d20 fantasy rpg. The first difference you’ll will notice, is the level 0 characters. They call this the CHARACTER CREATION FUNNEL. Every player rolls 3D6 for their abilities, and create 3 level 0 pc’s. They have no further classes, nor race bonuses, no modifiers, etc etc. Their hp is only a 1d4+stamina modifier. Their occupation and possessions are randomized with a d20 and a list for the results. The players play the first part of the campaign till they reach level 1. By then most pc’s will have died and the players choose which pc they will play for the rest of the campaign. the rest can become npcs. Since it only takes 10XP to reach level 1, this will probably be the next gaming session. The way you get XP is also based on successful encounters and not on kills. You don’t have to kill to learn something out of an encounter. This way it’s easier to earn XP from doing other things outside combat, in other RPG’s this also the case but the players are more encouraged to kill every enemy they see to level faster. The range of dice is also unusual. In this one you could use a d3, d4, d5, d6, d7, d8, d10, d%10, d12, d14, d16, d20, d24 and d30!! it’s looks quite complex, but it isn’t. This is called the DICE-CHAIN. When the rules says to use an improved die, you step up one die. So instead of a d6 you may use a d7. This is also cumulative, so you can step up multiple dice. The combat system isn’t necessarily based on a grid, but it can be played on a grid, on a table or just 'theater of the mind'. The MIGHTY DEEDS OF ARMS is something I really missed in other RPG’s. A warrior can declare a special move while attacking, so long it fits the situation. The warrior can try to land an attack specifically on the horns of a demon. Just roll a D3 to see if it would succeed to cut off the horns. SPELL DUELS! It’s the best magical battle concept I’ve seen so far. Basically when a spellcaster, casts a spell, like for example a magical missile, the other spellcasters who come after him in the initiative order can react immediately by casting a counterspell, for example magic shield! When that happens, they give up their actions in the normal initiative order in that round. The spellcasters who dueled must place a d20 on the table with the 10 facing upwards. The winner of the duel may change the dice one number up. The next time the spellcasters duel the difference between the numbers of their d20 are used as a bonus. The cool thing is that they can get in a sort of flow. Like in Lord of the Rings when Saruman fought against Gandalf in the second movie. (I’ve found a nice help chart for this spell system: click here ) Spells have also cool side effects! When casting the spell, the higher your spell check the better the spell results. The layout of the book is a mixed bag. Some pages look gorgeous, others not. There are different illustrators and the quality of their work isn’t always of the same height. That’s the problem, when somebody raises the bar, then the lesser illustrators look bad. The text layout isn’t always on a grid, the kerning is sometimes awful, the word-spacing and text flagging is sometimes just cringy… But the overall feel of the layout is pleasant, because it has a retro feel and it’s easy on the eye. The book is also written really well, everything is very clear. For an Rpg that claims to be for hardcore OGL 3.e players. For them it is a very accessible game.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Juho Pohjalainen

    It goes rather farther away from the old-school style of play than I would often prefer, but should I ever find myself wanting to do something closer to the new-school approach, the way 3rd and 5th edition do things, while still keeping the feel and the flavor of the times I like, then this is my game of choice.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Colin

    My go-to for fantasy RPGs, a game firmly based in Gary Gygax's Appendix N and in old-school sensibilities (with a common-sense approach to modern mechanics). DCC RPG takes everything I love about 40+ years of fantasy role-playing and distills all the best parts of it into one great game. There are certainly elements that seem like they should be a hard sell to modern gamers - an emphasis on old-school style random character generation (when most gamers now living have always been able to My go-to for fantasy RPGs, a game firmly based in Gary Gygax's Appendix N and in old-school sensibilities (with a common-sense approach to modern mechanics). DCC RPG takes everything I love about 40+ years of fantasy role-playing and distills all the best parts of it into one great game. There are certainly elements that seem like they should be a hard sell to modern gamers - an emphasis on old-school style random character generation (when most gamers now living have always been able to customize and build exactly the character they want), the "0-level funnel" (first game of a campaign, each starts with 4 completely random 0-level characters, and any that survive - IF any survive - become 1st-level characters for the campaign), race-as-class (i.e. Dwarf, Elf, and Halfling are classes, and no, you can't have a Dwarven Warrior or Halfling Thief), and a lack of fiddly bits like Feats and Skills and such. Oddly enough, after trying the game, these are often exactly the features that become the favorite things, not drawbacks! I can't imagine another game ever displacing DCC RPG as my favorite FRPG, and I am proud to spread its gospel wherever I go!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    The heavy metal, sword and sorcery, super deadly, weird magic, demon haunted game that AD&D wished it could be.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I might write a longer review at some point in the near-future, but suffice to say, this was sooooooooo worth reading!!!! DCC RPG flippin' kicks ass!! Even if I never play the game (though I hope to be judging a funnel very soon), it was worth reading. From the artwork to the overriding ethos of the game (inspired by what Joseph Goodman calls "pre-genre fantasy," aka "Appendix N" literature), the whole book is ridiculously cool and inspiring. Best rpg rulebook I have ever read!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Roger

    This is by far the best d20 RPG. It simplifies mechanics that are over complicated in that "other RPG", and eliminates un-needed ones. The spellcasting system is second to none, showcasing the volatility of magic in a fantasy world. I have used this for several games, spanning several genres. Also, it's one $40 book that's huge! VS buying THREE $60 books. ($40 VS $180 entry point?!?!)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Miguel López del Pueyo

    Auténtico espíritu de la vieja escuela (signifique eso lo que signifique) con un tono remozado y desenfadado. Pronostico diversión, aventuras y TPKs a raudales. No veo la hora de jugarlo.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Oliver Brackenbury

    It's hard to review the book without reviewing the game, but I think it's important to draw the distinction. Some great games have terrible rulebooks and vice versa. I'm going to start with just the book itself. DCC RPG is a FUN book to go through. It does a great job of conveying the philosophy behind the game, which is arguably the justification for the game itself in a world already populated by D&D as well as ever so many other fantasy RPGs. The art is bright, batshit in the best way, and It's hard to review the book without reviewing the game, but I think it's important to draw the distinction. Some great games have terrible rulebooks and vice versa. I'm going to start with just the book itself. DCC RPG is a FUN book to go through. It does a great job of conveying the philosophy behind the game, which is arguably the justification for the game itself in a world already populated by D&D as well as ever so many other fantasy RPGs. The art is bright, batshit in the best way, and very much in line with the game's philosophy. It's definitely a pleasure to read and look at. But it has some weird gaps, like how there's plenty of detail on magic items, magic weapons, potions, scrolls, and so on...but no magic armor. There are several places where they stress how a GM, or "Judge", should be willing to just make up their own stuff but that wasn't one of them - nor should it have been. So there's consistency issues and a few gaps that don't feel like room to invent so much as an incomplete product. I admire the hell out of the DCC RPG crowd's desire to keep the game within a single rulebook, however they might want to think about either a new, more complete edition (What's another thirty pages when you're already at 450?) or relaxing that rule to allow a single, slim, supplementary book. As for the game itself? I'll get back to you when I've run it a few times, but at a glance it looks like something for people who are okay juggling lots of tables and specific rules. More than once I found myself drafting custom reference cards or character sheets with lots of page numbers for quick reference. However, given the personality of the game I can see it being just piles of fun, so who knows?

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    Possibly the best game book I've ever read. The adaptation of "classic D&D" is perfect. I have not played the game yet but it seems incredibly fun. The illustrations alone are worth it. In fact, many old school D&D artists have provided illustrations for this book. There are tribute illustrations to the AD&D books if you look carefully. Also, this book revives the early D&D cartoons with gaming humor, which I really enjoyed. Overall, the writing style is great and the way the Possibly the best game book I've ever read. The adaptation of "classic D&D" is perfect. I have not played the game yet but it seems incredibly fun. The illustrations alone are worth it. In fact, many old school D&D artists have provided illustrations for this book. There are tribute illustrations to the AD&D books if you look carefully. Also, this book revives the early D&D cartoons with gaming humor, which I really enjoyed. Overall, the writing style is great and the way the rules are presented are just fun to read. The handling of magic in this system is really unique and acquiring new spells are the foundations of quests. They're just not selected to min/max your character. Monsters are handled nicely here too. There's a dose of science fantasy like androids, time travelers, brains in jars, etc. Demons, Dragons, and Giants are unique and scary. While maybe not as extensive a bestiary as some RPGs, there's plenty here to stock your dungeon and more advice on making your own creatures. If you ever played AD&D you should at least read this book. It is definitely in the mold of "Appendix N!"

  11. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

    Mazmorreo de la vieja escuela bastante curioso: quiere un sistema sencillo y dinámico, alejado de cálculos extensos y tardes enteras para diseñar un personaje, o de intentar cubrir cualquier situación con una regla específica, pero luego te añade tablas de todo tipo para usar durante la partida y plantea un sistema de dados extra que se añaden a los de toda la vida. Lo importante, de todas maneras, es lo mucho que insiste en que las reglas son tuyas y que las uses cómo y cuándo desees, tanto a Mazmorreo de la vieja escuela bastante curioso: quiere un sistema sencillo y dinámico, alejado de cálculos extensos y tardes enteras para diseñar un personaje, o de intentar cubrir cualquier situación con una regla específica, pero luego te añade tablas de todo tipo para usar durante la partida y plantea un sistema de dados extra que se añaden a los de toda la vida. Lo importante, de todas maneras, es lo mucho que insiste en que las reglas son tuyas y que las uses cómo y cuándo desees, tanto a la hora de diseñar tu escenario como los propios monstruos. Esto, la apuesta por llegar a la variedad de personajes no por la planificación medida y meditada de todo sino por la aleatoriedad, y la ingente cantidad de material alternativo para diseñar tu partida perfecta que tiene en internet, es lo que me lo ha vendido. No creo que vaya a jugarlo en la vida pero ya estoy escribiendo aventuras.

  12. 4 out of 5

    John Smith

    A Fantastic old school rpg that captures the feel of the appendix n fantasy and science fiction that inspired Dungeons and Dragons. Very interesting and different way of handling magic and critical hits and critical failures in game.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Horrorsage

    There are a lot of things in here I like, but some of the usages of non standard DnD dice makes it weird to play

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kris Miller

  15. 5 out of 5

    Matt Bohnhoff

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alex Nguyen

  17. 4 out of 5

    Djmen

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mario

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jonathon

  20. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jesse G.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Josiah

  23. 5 out of 5

    Frank Romero

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mike Migdall

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joel Davidson

  27. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Myrick

  28. 4 out of 5

    Trevor Bramble

  29. 5 out of 5

    John Large

  30. 5 out of 5

    Carl

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