Hot Best Seller

Delighting in the Trinity: An Introduction to the Christian Faith

Availability: Ready to download

In this brief and winsome book, Michael Reeves presents an introduction to the Christian faith that is rooted in the triune God. He takes cues from preachers and teachers down through the ages, setting key doctrines of creation, the person and work of Christ, and life in the Spirit into a simple framework of the Christian life. A rich and enjoyable read on the basic In this brief and winsome book, Michael Reeves presents an introduction to the Christian faith that is rooted in the triune God. He takes cues from preachers and teachers down through the ages, setting key doctrines of creation, the person and work of Christ, and life in the Spirit into a simple framework of the Christian life. A rich and enjoyable read on the basic beliefs of Christianity that avoids dumbing down its profound and life changing truths.


Compare

In this brief and winsome book, Michael Reeves presents an introduction to the Christian faith that is rooted in the triune God. He takes cues from preachers and teachers down through the ages, setting key doctrines of creation, the person and work of Christ, and life in the Spirit into a simple framework of the Christian life. A rich and enjoyable read on the basic In this brief and winsome book, Michael Reeves presents an introduction to the Christian faith that is rooted in the triune God. He takes cues from preachers and teachers down through the ages, setting key doctrines of creation, the person and work of Christ, and life in the Spirit into a simple framework of the Christian life. A rich and enjoyable read on the basic beliefs of Christianity that avoids dumbing down its profound and life changing truths.

30 review for Delighting in the Trinity: An Introduction to the Christian Faith

  1. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Vellacott

    Mixed feelings about this book. Firstly, it is a short, easy read. The author explains why the doctrine of the Trinity is central to Christian life and practice. He focuses on the fact that God (the Father) has been showing love eternally to the other members of the Trinity because He is three in one. If He was a single entity then there would have been no opportunity for Him to show love and therefore He would have become used to being distant, aloof and selfish. With this, the author contrasts Mixed feelings about this book. Firstly, it is a short, easy read. The author explains why the doctrine of the Trinity is central to Christian life and practice. He focuses on the fact that God (the Father) has been showing love eternally to the other members of the Trinity because He is three in one. If He was a single entity then there would have been no opportunity for Him to show love and therefore He would have become used to being distant, aloof and selfish. With this, the author contrasts Christianity with other faiths. I'm not sure that limiting God through this observation is helpful, but it's worth thinking about the idea. His assessment of God and His attributes is interesting but perhaps somewhat skewed in favour of the points he wants to make. That said, I learned a lot about the Trinity some of which I had not considered before or had just accepted from reading other books. I didn't like the graphic illustrations of all three members of the Trinity in the book. I could hardly believe it when I saw God the Father depicted in one of the pictures. I understand that these are historical drawings, but surely the second commandment applies here as well. I also struggled with the emphasis on feelings and emotions that we should have towards God and our relationship with Him. A lot of Christian authors seem to be placing greater emphasis on the subjective and changeable and less on obedience and perseverance in the faith. This may just be my personal opinion though. Despite being short, the book was a bit repetitive in places. I would still recommend it for those wanting to learn about the Trinity as it provides a useful perspective and is clear that the Trinity is a fundamental doctrine that we cannot be without.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    A winsome introduction to basic Christian thinking. Very enjoyable.

  3. 4 out of 5

    John Onwuchekwa

    Incredible. Insightful. Never have those two words been such an understatement. This is the gold standard for what theology books should do and be. Simple. Clear. Profound. Accessible. Inspiring. Witty. WELL-WRITTEN.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

    BEST book of 2012 Despite the efforts of the historical creeds and confessions, there remains massive confusion on the goodness and triune nature of God as taught in scripture. It's easy to seem coldly impersonal when discussing the Trinity, but this book shows how to remain theologically precise and warmly personal as we should be. "This is the message we have heard from Him and proclaim to you, that God is light, and in Him is no darkness at all." (1 Jn. 1:5)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Paul Elliott

    Short and to the point, but oh so meaty. Reeves serves as a guide, taking readers on a journey to see why it’s so important (and beautiful) that God is three persons. A few key takeaways: a singular God wouldn’t have any fellowship/love to invite others into (but the triune God does!), creation is an overflow of the Father’s eternal love of the Son, and God has ALWAYS poured himself out for another. I intend to chew on this one for quite some time!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Castro

    Delighting in the Trinity focuses on precisely what its title implies: this is a book about the love found within the relationship of the Godhead, how this love is emulated by believers through the Holy Spirit, and why it is central to Christianity. Not so much an intensive apologetic as it is an emphatic exhibition of the significance of the Trinity, Reeves actively engages the reader in a vigorous dialogue replete with profound insights, concise exposition, an overview of the doctrine's Delighting in the Trinity focuses on precisely what its title implies: this is a book about the love found within the relationship of the Godhead, how this love is emulated by believers through the Holy Spirit, and why it is central to Christianity. Not so much an intensive apologetic as it is an emphatic exhibition of the significance of the Trinity, Reeves actively engages the reader in a vigorous dialogue replete with profound insights, concise exposition, an overview of the doctrine's history, and bursts of witty humor. Above all, it is short and easy-to-read; perfect as supplemental reading. Highly recommended to both new and old believers.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Audrey Jost

    I was soul-hungry for this book. It was on my reading list for a while, and now I wonder why I didn't read it sooner. It opened my understanding so much about WHO this amazing, loving, Triune God is, and why this doctrine of the Trinity isn't just a weird, incomprehensible mystery or dry abstraction. It is the very heartbeat of Christianity, the glorious center and source of our LIFE! Your view of God shapes you in the most profound way. Make sure you have a true view of Him! I am grateful for I was soul-hungry for this book. It was on my reading list for a while, and now I wonder why I didn't read it sooner. It opened my understanding so much about WHO this amazing, loving, Triune God is, and why this doctrine of the Trinity isn't just a weird, incomprehensible mystery or dry abstraction. It is the very heartbeat of Christianity, the glorious center and source of our LIFE! Your view of God shapes you in the most profound way. Make sure you have a true view of Him! I am grateful for this book, and highly recommend it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kendall Davis

    This is probably one of the best books I'll read this year. Reeves has opened my eyes to see how God being trinitarian is utterly essential to the entire Christian faith. In a real sense, everything from Creation to the incarnation to redemption make no sense if God is not trinitarian. Everyone should read this book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Hunter

    PERSONAL STORY WARNING! I graduated from Duke University Divinity School in 2004 with a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) degree. Ordination as a Deacon in the United Methodist Church followed in 2009. Since my primary ministry setting has been as Executive Director or President of human services-linked nonprofits, I've never served exclusively in a local church setting. Not surprisingly, my theological commitment and understanding waned over time due to innocent neglect. Recently, I've become more PERSONAL STORY WARNING! I graduated from Duke University Divinity School in 2004 with a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) degree. Ordination as a Deacon in the United Methodist Church followed in 2009. Since my primary ministry setting has been as Executive Director or President of human services-linked nonprofits, I've never served exclusively in a local church setting. Not surprisingly, my theological commitment and understanding waned over time due to innocent neglect. Recently, I've become more passionate about studying Christian theology. I crave a deeper relationship with God. I won't claim John Wesley's "heart strangely warmed" experience for myself, but there's something happening at my core that's not acid reflux related! In response, I've started boning up on Christian theology and philosophy once again. I've encountered two amazing books thus far - Abraham Kuyper's Lectures on Calvinism and Michael Reeves' Delighting in the Trinity: An Introduction to the Christian Faith. Both kick ass. Here's Reeves' description of his book's purpose:[T]he truth is that God is love because God is a Trinity. This book, then, will simply be about growing in our enjoyment of God and seeing how God's triune being makes all his ways beautiful. It is a chance to taste and see that the Lord is good, to have your heart won and yourself refreshed. For it is only when you grasp what it means for God to be a Trinity that you really sense the beauty, the overflowing kindness, the heart-grabbing loveliness of God. If the Trinity were something we could shave off God, we would not be relieving him of some irksome weight; we would be shearing him of precisely what is so delightful about him. For God is triune, and it is as triune that he is so good and desirable.I'm in! Reeves doesn't give us a "how to" manual; he wants to help us know God. I'm happy to proclaim Reeves a success! I loved this book, and plan to reread it often. Depending on the reader, the repetitive nature of Delighting in the Trinity: An Introduction to the Christian Faith might detract from the reading experience. I'm a fan of repetition in worship and the Psalms, which helped me enjoy the verse-and-chorus-like rhythm of the text. And depending on where you are in your life journey, I might even dare to say this bad boy could change your worldview. Give it a try!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jake Burlaga

    Wonderful read, Reeves stresses the necessity to be thinking more Trinitarian in our lives. He explains how God must exist in a trinity, and how God’s love can only make sense in an eternal fellowship with the Son and the Spirit. This is a super paperback and it is one of the best Christian books I’ve read. Very clear and the ideas are explained clearly.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Pindak

    One of the best books I have read! Reeves points to the loving relational essence of Who God is in His trinititarian nature. Reading this book has revealed of my the holes in my theology and perception of God and reminded me that He is Love- Father, Son and Spirit so good. Rereadable for sure. One of the best books I have read! Reeves points to the loving relational essence of Who God is in His trinititarian nature. Reading this book has revealed of my the holes in my theology and perception of God and reminded me that He is Love- Father, Son and Spirit 💛 so good. Rereadable for sure.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Kassing

    This was a fun read! Reeves is a great writer and his book on the trinity shows why the doctrine is beautiful and practical. I will be recommending this book again and again because of that and because it is accessible.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Rogers

    This short book thrills with the beauty of God, and it brought me out of a blank-stare, shoulder-shrug theology of the Trinity. "Delighting in the Trinity" ought to be held up among the other classics of Christian nonfiction: "Confessions," "Orthodoxy," "Mere Christianity," etc. Reeves demonstrates not only why the Trinity is not a liability, but why it is actually the main reason why the Christian God works where other gods fail. I love that this book doesn't settle merely for bringing the This short book thrills with the beauty of God, and it brought me out of a blank-stare, shoulder-shrug theology of the Trinity. "Delighting in the Trinity" ought to be held up among the other classics of Christian nonfiction: "Confessions," "Orthodoxy," "Mere Christianity," etc. Reeves demonstrates not only why the Trinity is not a liability, but why it is actually the main reason why the Christian God works where other gods fail. I love that this book doesn't settle merely for bringing the reader to an academic understanding of the Trinity; this book is about "delighting" in the Trinity. Reeves revels in the beauty and joy that can only come from the trinitarian God. "Delighting in the Trinity" is funny, easy to read, practical, deep, and stands to be life-changing. This is required reading for Christians.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Maybe the best book I've read this year. Excellent.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Justin Orman

    Michael Reeves’ book ‘Delighting in the Trinity’ might sound uninteresting - what could be more boring than a book about an irrelevant, hair-splitting point of doctrine? - but it was for me one of the most beneficial, rich, and uplifting books I’ve ever read. I would rate it 6* if I could. The subtitle of this book is ‘An introduction to the Christian Faith’. This is an accurate title: Answering fundamental questions like ‘Who is God and what is he like? Why is he three persons?’ etc. this book Michael Reeves’ book ‘Delighting in the Trinity’ might sound uninteresting - what could be more boring than a book about an irrelevant, hair-splitting point of doctrine? - but it was for me one of the most beneficial, rich, and uplifting books I’ve ever read. I would rate it 6* if I could. The subtitle of this book is ‘An introduction to the Christian Faith’. This is an accurate title: Answering fundamental questions like ‘Who is God and what is he like? Why is he three persons?’ etc. this book is remarkably relevant and instructive on the basics of the faith. Far from being a negative, I would say this book is just as important for the seasoned pastor as it is for the new believer, the average church-goer, and especially the believer struggling with their faith. Read it. Learn from it. It will be balm to your soul.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I remember facing an uncomfortable tension many years back while studying pre-calculus (math is not my forte). Everything discussed in the class was absolutely foreign to me--from the symbols being used to theprofessor himself, who danced around the chalkboard as if these complex formulas were poetry to his heart. I, however, work better with words, not numbers! The tension was between not understanding the subject and the nagging feeling that it was important to learn. So there I sat, wrestling I remember facing an uncomfortable tension many years back while studying pre-calculus (math is not my forte). Everything discussed in the class was absolutely foreign to me--from the symbols being used to the professor himself, who danced around the chalkboard as if these complex formulas were poetry to his heart. I, however, work better with words, not numbers! The tension was between not understanding the subject and the nagging feeling that it was important to learn. So there I sat, wrestling with concepts I couldn't grasp, hoping they would eventually sink in. But they never did. So I relegated most forms of math to the back of my brain, assuming that if I'm ever required to use derivatives, referring to the calculator on my iPhone will suffice. As it turns out, I've discovered that life is full of equations that bewilder my smart-phone. So, what does this have to do with a review of a book on God? What I just described is how many deal with the doctrine of the Trinity, Christianity's basic belief in a God who exists in three persons. We sense that it's an important doctrine to believe, but we may not necessarily know why we believe it, or why it matters. So as I did with pre-calculus, we put the doctrine of the Trinity on the shelf where it won't bother us, but can be easily accessible in case an angel of the Lord drops in to give us a theological pop-quiz. But there is good news! Michael Reeves writes Delighting in the Trinity: An Introduction to the Christian Faith to confirm that our intuition is at least half correct. It is an important doctrine, for "what makes Christianity absolutely distinct is the identity of our God" (15). But it can also be thoroughly enjoyed. In fact, Reeves will make his case that the doctrine of the Trinity is worth pulling off the dusty shelf to gaze at for a while. The first two sections are worth the price of the book alone. In the introduction, Reeves explains that the essence of the Trinity is the source of everything Christian you will ever experience, declaring that "what we assume would be a dull or peculiar irrelevance turns out to be the source of all that is good in Christianity. Neither a problem nor a technicality,  the triune being of God is the vital oxygen of Christian life and joy" (18). And it's this hope that Reeves uncoils through the rest of the book. Having a knowledgable professor (King's College) write on a weighty topic with a young audience in mind seems to give the book a pleasant feel. Reeves keeps the jargon at a distance, choosing to wrestle only with concepts that satiate the average reader's appetite for who God is. His writing style is sprinkled with a charming vernacular not ordinarily found in a subject of this girth. For example, he refers to the doctrine of the Trinity as a "perplexing dish" (12), a "vital oxygen" (18), and "delicious" (96). One of my favorite aspects of this book is that Reeves wrestles with your affections, as well as your intellect. But don't think this book is only for the young believer. Though Delighting in the Trinity is winsome, it is imbued with a robust theology spanning a panoramic view of church history, ranging everywhere from the Athanasian creed to Martin Luther, from ecclesiastical developments, to vignettes of past saints. Chapter one is a beautifully crafted doxology. If Reeves desires to persuade you in the introduction, his main intent in this chapter is to thrill you. He moves you past the necessity of believing in the Trinity to wondering how your communion with God ever got along without such a potent view! Interacting with God the Father and God the Son, he tackles the themes of life they affect, from childhood issues and broken relationships to our longing for something more. The rest of the book is filled with the personal interactions between each Trinitarian Person, where Reeves devotes one chapter to each. This is followed by a treatment of inevitable misunderstandings that are typical when talking about God, such as the reason for evil, and whether God is just in displaying his wrath. Throughout his writing, Reeves never assumes the reader will capitulate to his viewpoints, but carefully navigates his convictions using clever analogies, conditional statements, and sound logic, all of which is done with tremendous compassion. The book concludes as succinctly as it began, with an intellectually honest appeal to consider the object of your worship. If you are a Christ-follower, or are thinking about becoming one, this is a fine introduction to Christianity's most enduring tenet: "So the Father is God, the Son is God, and the Holy Spirit is God; and yet they are not three God's, but one God." (Athanasian Creed, 15-16) Get your copy on Amazon!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marla O'Fallon

    “So next time you look up at the sun, moon and stars and wonder, remember: they are there because God loves, because the Father’s love for the Son burst out that it might be enjoyed by many. And they remain there only because God does not stop loving. He is an attentive Father who numbers every hair on our heads, for whom the fall of every sparrow matters; and out of love he upholds all things through his Son, and breathes out natural life on all through his Spirit.”

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Ray

    A fantastic little book. Clear, simple without being simplistic, and saturated with awe of and worship of the triune God. Reeves casts a positive vision (not just "the Trinity is *not* x, y, or z) of the Trinity while discussing how this distinctly Christian doctrine impacts how we understand God and how we live that understanding out in obedience to him. Highly, highly recommended.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Becky Pliego

    Beautiful. Deep. Easy to read. Loved it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Delighting in the Trinity was indeed a delight to read! I've read several books on this truly delightful aspect of Christian belief that were turgid tomes that seemed to confirm the suspicions many have that doctrine is the dry, dusty stuff of human invention. For Michael Reeves, the Trinity is a joyous essential of Christian belief. He observes how in fact the contention that "God is love" makes no sense of God is a unitary, singular being. He shows how in fact the good and beautiful Delighting in the Trinity was indeed a delight to read! I've read several books on this truly delightful aspect of Christian belief that were turgid tomes that seemed to confirm the suspicions many have that doctrine is the dry, dusty stuff of human invention. For Michael Reeves, the Trinity is a joyous essential of Christian belief. He observes how in fact the contention that "God is love" makes no sense of God is a unitary, singular being. He shows how in fact the good and beautiful relationship of Father, Son, and Spirit overflow into a good and beautiful creation. And when we used our freedom to love God to rebel, the Triune God worked to restore us with Father and Son acting as one to make atonement for us. Likewise, the Spirit of God brings us into the intimacy of relationship by not only making sense to us of the deep things of the Trinity but through actually residing in us and drawing us into the life of the Trinity. Reeves contends that the problem in fact with God that so many atheists and "anti-theists" have is with a monotheistic conception of a God far removed from his creatures and creation, that is puritanically holy but with no real connection with his creatures. The Trinity gives the lie to this idea. He even argues that even the wrath of God is in fact the love of God fighting for his good intentions in the face of evil--or as Jonathan Edwards would say, his "strange work". This is a short work (130 pages)but one written with great clarity and warmth turning what is often thought dry and dusty and obscure into joyful truth that nurtures our love and intimacy with the Triune God.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gavin McGrath

    I enjoyed this book. Trinity must shape all our theology. Reeves helpfully shows this. I experienced, however, some frustrations. At times, to be honest, I wasn't sure where I the reader was in his argument. Perhaps, this was my deficiency. On the other hand, there were points when I would have liked a tighter and more disciplined order. I also found some of the assumptions/presuppositions lacking -- even if I agreed. For example, Reeves juxtaposes a Single-god with the Triune God. I thought I enjoyed this book. Trinity must shape all our theology. Reeves helpfully shows this. I experienced, however, some frustrations. At times, to be honest, I wasn't sure where I the reader was in his argument. Perhaps, this was my deficiency. On the other hand, there were points when I would have liked a tighter and more disciplined order. I also found some of the assumptions/presuppositions lacking -- even if I agreed. For example, Reeves juxtaposes a Single-god with the Triune God. I thought this is a good point but then Reeves makes sweeping statements about the single-god without strong support. (I agree with him but wanted weightier support) I would have benefitted from Reeves showing me that the Johanine material isn't the only source for seeing the intimacy between the Trinity. (Again, I agree with this conclusion but wanted further support) A minor quibble: which probably is more a reflection of me but I did find some of the informal asides jarring in the midst of deep theology. Yet, my frustrations aside this is indeed (as another reviewer put it) paradigm shifting. To think and yes, Delight (see Jonathan Edwards),in the Trinity is life-giving! Thank you Mike Reeves.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Rapinchuk

    Reeves has done a marvelous job of showing the central importance of the doctrine of the Trinity for Christianity. More specifically, it is not the doctrine that is central, but the reality of who God is AS Trinity--Father, Son, and Spirit--that is central to Christianity. Reeves highlights the self-giving, loving nature of the Father, which is magnified by the obedient, loving response of the Son who delights in the Father, and the life-giving love of the Spirit for Father and Son as the Reeves has done a marvelous job of showing the central importance of the doctrine of the Trinity for Christianity. More specifically, it is not the doctrine that is central, but the reality of who God is AS Trinity--Father, Son, and Spirit--that is central to Christianity. Reeves highlights the self-giving, loving nature of the Father, which is magnified by the obedient, loving response of the Son who delights in the Father, and the life-giving love of the Spirit for Father and Son as the foundation for all the Christian life. He gives examples from creation and salvation, as well as frequently showing how a one-person God cannot be loving in his very nature, thus the beauty of this Tri-unity. Reeves helps show how our very identity as creatures created in the image of this Triune God mark us in our very natures as creatures created for love and fellowship. These are just a few of the wonderful insights and reminders of Reeves' work. Definitely worthwhile reading for all Christians.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Russ

    This book offered helpful reflection on the implications of the Trinity for other fundamental aspects of Christian doctrine. E.g., if God is eternally love, he must also be eternally in community in a way a Unitarian view of God does not equip us for. However, not all arguments were argued from scripture. Much of it was a matter of what ‘makes sense’ to the author (or historical theologians), which is helpful to a degree, but also limited when addressing a concept as paradoxical as the 3-in-1 This book offered helpful reflection on the implications of the Trinity for other fundamental aspects of Christian doctrine. E.g., if God is eternally love, he must also be eternally in community in a way a Unitarian view of God does not equip us for. However, not all arguments were argued from scripture. Much of it was a matter of what ‘makes sense’ to the author (or historical theologians), which is helpful to a degree, but also limited when addressing a concept as paradoxical as the 3-in-1 nature of God. Needs to be more explicitly rooted in the Bible to be truly compelling.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Richie Valdes

    Truly one of the most accessible apologetic reads on one of the most intimidating doctrines. Reeves is compelling in his thesis while using everyday language that can communicate the historic Christian view on the triune nature of God that brings his audience along to probe the depths of this rich truth. Highly recommended this book. For a first time dip into the depths of the Trinity or for a trinitarian scholar.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    This book definitely helped clarify some confusion I have always had about the Trinity and offered new perspectives around the creation and prayer which had never crossed my mind. It was very repetitive and went in circles drumming the same points throughout the entire book but one thing is for sure, that helps remember what the whole point is, that only a triune God can love, have fellowship, share and spread love, beauty, holiness and glory.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joostnixon

    I Love this book. It is so rich, and so helpful in adjusting one's view of God away from the "Angry Father" view. It set some of my bones. Simple writing style, intended to engage college students. Whether that isd a selling point for you, or a turn-off--read the book. The ideas linger...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Deeter

    Other than Packer's "Knowing God", I have never read a book that was so equally theological and devotional.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joe Haack

    This is such a great book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Richey

    Wonderful little book. A good example of the joy of knowing God and who He is. Easy to follow, yet profound,

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    One of the best Christian books I have ever read.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.