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Truer Than True Romance: Classic Love Comics Retold

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Bestselling author Martinet puts an irreverent spin on the dating attitudes and advice doled out years ago. She updates ten classic DC Comics romance stories, creating all-new word balloons and captions to go with the original artwork. 98 color illustrations.


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Bestselling author Martinet puts an irreverent spin on the dating attitudes and advice doled out years ago. She updates ten classic DC Comics romance stories, creating all-new word balloons and captions to go with the original artwork. 98 color illustrations.

30 review for Truer Than True Romance: Classic Love Comics Retold

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    I've read this book several times, and it still gets me giggling out loud. Martinet takes romance comics from the 50s and 60s and replaces the dialog to create new plots, often playing off the awkward artwork.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lili

    Yes, this is as clever as the publisher's blurb makes it sound. The basic premise is that romance comics in the 1960s and 1970s shaped her strange (if not unrealistic) notions about dating and romance. So, she took out her eraser, replaced the original dialogue with something more realistic, and left the artwork/layout unchanged. Add in some farcical romance advice columns and it is HILARIOUS! The only reason I withheld its final star is that some of the stories are just too far off center, and Yes, this is as clever as the publisher's blurb makes it sound. The basic premise is that romance comics in the 1960s and 1970s shaped her strange (if not unrealistic) notions about dating and romance. So, she took out her eraser, replaced the original dialogue with something more realistic, and left the artwork/layout unchanged. Add in some farcical romance advice columns and it is HILARIOUS! The only reason I withheld its final star is that some of the stories are just too far off center, and would have been funnier if they were a little more realistic. Someone else with more of a sense of humor may disagree. Also, not having grown up with the original romance comics, it is a little hard to believe that the author did not take liberties with her summaries of the original comic. Some of those are just too much, and probably would have made me laugh to read them in their original form. The ten "new" comics include: "My Heart Said Yes, But My Therapist Said No!," "Too Dumb for Love," "I Hate My Hair," "My Heart of Darkness," "Psychic Matchmaker," "Carry-on Girl" (my personal favorite), "The Job From Hell," "Loving Gay Men," "The Narcissist Heart," and "What Are You Saying?" The last one includes a girl sending a rum cake to her "beau" serving in a combat theater, and the ensuing lack of sobriety causes him to get shot in the face. I'm not sending any more rum balls overseas. The book is out of print, but I'm willing to loan out my copy. Be warned that it MUST BE returned because I like to read parts of it when I need a good laugh.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rich Meyer

    An interesting approach, this little book tries to almost MST3K-ify old romance comics. All the dialogue and story has been replaced with suitably warped comedy. Some are real funny; some are just mildly humorous. But the real joy of the book is seeing the great reproduction of all this old comic artwork. There aren't all that many reprint books out there for this genre, so even this tome, with a complete different purpose is nice to see.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    For those of us who devoted our senior year of high school to writing mocking parodies of romance novels, this is a must read. The author has taken classic romance comic books and changed all of the word bubbles to reflect a more humorous, if not more realistic, vision of reality. I especially enjoyed the girl who lives by a polluted bay and is "Too Dumb for Love!"

  5. 5 out of 5

    D.M.

    The premise: a 'modern romance' columnist takes some classic DC romance comics, replaces all the dialogue and plots with her own, and hilarity ensues. Not perfect, but damned funny! If Rachel Earle wrote a romance comic, I imagine it would come out like this. Makes me laugh and laugh (especially the second story).

  6. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    Those teary-eyed dames of the '50s romance comics are dragged kicking and screaming into today to deal with the romantic dilemmas that modern women face, as the author applies new dialog and narrative to existing artwork. The result is a hilarious look back on simpler times that holds up well to repeated readings. In fact, I read it twice in a row during a recent business trip overseas.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    One of my favorites!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    Brilliant, twisted and hysterical!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lizzy

    annie

  10. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    Some stories are funnier than others but it is mostly entertaining.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rima

    HiLArious.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Scritch

    The illustrations are the originals (beautiful and idiotic simultaneously) but the writing made me cry laughing.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    Painfully funny.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rosa

    I was howling, cackling, and guffawing out loud! So hilarious! I didn't give it five stars because there weren't enough happy endings, and I didn't love the "I Loved Gay Men" story.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    Romance comics are ridiculous. What makes soap operas even barely watchable are the actors doing surprised gasps and reaction stares. So, thankfully, someone took the dreadful romance comics from the 1940s to 1970s and did up new dialogue. It’s super ridiculous now, but in a good way. Instead of boy meets girl and it ends happily, the stories range from a girl being treated for narcissism to a girl trying to ungay her brother’s boyfriend. Everything pokes fun at the most general stereotypes of Romance comics are ridiculous. What makes soap operas even barely watchable are the actors doing surprised gasps and reaction stares. So, thankfully, someone took the dreadful romance comics from the 1940s to 1970s and did up new dialogue. It’s super ridiculous now, but in a good way. Instead of boy meets girl and it ends happily, the stories range from a girl being treated for narcissism to a girl trying to ungay her brother’s boyfriend. Everything pokes fun at the most general stereotypes of women are weak, overly sensitive creatures that crave male attention and men being dumb, unfeeling, arrogant sex-panderers. It’s fun with an innocent bite. There’s even a few “Dear Abbey” type sections with women writing in for love advice. The answers are things like “buy a new dress” or “kill yourself.” Rad.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Will

    Jeanne Martinet has written a hilarious send-up of romance comics in this Roy Lichtenstein-inspired gag-fest. The gimmick is she used the original artwork from DC romance comics and changed the angsty dialogue in the word balloons and captions. So "Summer Heart," a story about a girl who finds love in a seaside town, becomes "Too Dumb For Love," a story about a girl who is so dumb she can't remember her own name; and "A Heart Full Of Dreams!", about an insecure girl who falls for her brother's Jeanne Martinet has written a hilarious send-up of romance comics in this Roy Lichtenstein-inspired gag-fest. The gimmick is she used the original artwork from DC romance comics and changed the angsty dialogue in the word balloons and captions. So "Summer Heart," a story about a girl who finds love in a seaside town, becomes "Too Dumb For Love," a story about a girl who is so dumb she can't remember her own name; and "A Heart Full Of Dreams!", about an insecure girl who falls for her brother's friend, becomes "Loving Gay Men!", the story of a girl who can *only* meet gay guys. There are ten stories in all and I found myself laughing out loud through most of them.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marfita

    Whatta great scam! Take the old True Romance comics you read as a child that ruined your prospects for happiness by setting up unrealistic expectations in the romance department and, using the same artwork, totally rewrite them! This merited some actual guffaws! And that was just from the original material that was provided for the contrast! I mean, it took me several minutes to get it through my thick head that "NY Restaurant Menu Typist" was a career in the original, not the parody! Ahhh, this Whatta great scam! Take the old True Romance comics you read as a child that ruined your prospects for happiness by setting up unrealistic expectations in the romance department and, using the same artwork, totally rewrite them! This merited some actual guffaws! And that was just from the original material that was provided for the contrast! I mean, it took me several minutes to get it through my thick head that "NY Restaurant Menu Typist" was a career in the original, not the parody! Ahhh, this really took the bad taste out of my mouth from the previous graphic graphic novels!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This is a cute idea. One of my favorite things is when someone tries to update something and then a few years pass so the update has become doubly dated. So yeah, some jokes about the 90s pasted over images from preceding decades. Mostly pretty good, but some of it falls pretty flat. The comics are definitely better than the interstitial advice column bits, which tend toward the "being mean is the same as being funny" style of humor.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    A brilliant hilarous must read for fans of hipster feminist irony. The author takes 70's romance (complete with the sexism and bad art) and redoes all the text. She changes what everyone says and does to be unintentionally hilarious. The cover promises a woman in the arms of a man who says "Wow. You really are clingy and filled with self-loathing. No wonder I find you so attractive!" and the insides deliver.

  20. 4 out of 5

    E.M. Epps

    The concept is simple. Take old "True Romance" comics and erase the dialogue. Then, write new dialogue. And laugh your ass off. It's scary how well this gag works - without the brief synopsis of the original plot before each comic, I never would have been able to believe that the story had ever been anything different from what's presented here. Hilarious.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Fun and quick read/

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tab

    3.5

  23. 5 out of 5

    Diana Welsch

    This was amusing, but I get the feeling the original comics might be funnier.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Connery

    Great idea; very weak execution.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wallace

    Kind of funny, mostly unfortunate

  26. 4 out of 5

    Hemi

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dayva

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rev. Nyarkoleptek

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rick

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