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Comics As Philosophy

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Contributions by Jeremy Barris, Laura Canis and Paul Canis, Stanford W. Carpenter, Kevin de Laplante, Robert C. Harvey, Terry Kading, Jeff McLaughlin, Amy Kiste Nyberg, Aldo Regalado, Pierre Skilling, and Iain Thomson Through the combination of text and images, comic books offer a unique opportunity to explore deep questions about aesthetics, ethics, and epistemology in Contributions by Jeremy Barris, Laura Canis and Paul Canis, Stanford W. Carpenter, Kevin de Laplante, Robert C. Harvey, Terry Kading, Jeff McLaughlin, Amy Kiste Nyberg, Aldo Regalado, Pierre Skilling, and Iain Thomson Through the combination of text and images, comic books offer a unique opportunity to explore deep questions about aesthetics, ethics, and epistemology in nontraditional ways. The essays in this collection focus on a wide variety of genres, from mainstream superhero comics, to graphic novels of social realism, to European adventure classics. Included among the contributions are essays on existentialism in Daniel Clowes's graphic novel Ghost World, ecocriticism in Paul Chadwick's long-running Concrete series, and political philosophies in Herg�'s perennially popular The Adventures of Tintin. Modern political concerns inform Terry Kading's discussion of how superhero comics have responded to 9/11 and how the genre reflects the anxieties of the contemporary world. Essayists also explore the issues surrounding the development and appreciation of comics. Amy Kiste Nyberg examines the rise of the Comics Code, using it as a springboard for discussing the ethics of censorship and child protection in America. Stanford W. Carpenter uses interviews to analyze how a team of Marvel artists and writers reimagined the origin of one of Marvel's most iconic superheroes, Captain America. Throughout, essayists in Comics as Philosophy show how well the form can be used by its artists and its interpreters as a means of philosophical inquiry.


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Contributions by Jeremy Barris, Laura Canis and Paul Canis, Stanford W. Carpenter, Kevin de Laplante, Robert C. Harvey, Terry Kading, Jeff McLaughlin, Amy Kiste Nyberg, Aldo Regalado, Pierre Skilling, and Iain Thomson Through the combination of text and images, comic books offer a unique opportunity to explore deep questions about aesthetics, ethics, and epistemology in Contributions by Jeremy Barris, Laura Canis and Paul Canis, Stanford W. Carpenter, Kevin de Laplante, Robert C. Harvey, Terry Kading, Jeff McLaughlin, Amy Kiste Nyberg, Aldo Regalado, Pierre Skilling, and Iain Thomson Through the combination of text and images, comic books offer a unique opportunity to explore deep questions about aesthetics, ethics, and epistemology in nontraditional ways. The essays in this collection focus on a wide variety of genres, from mainstream superhero comics, to graphic novels of social realism, to European adventure classics. Included among the contributions are essays on existentialism in Daniel Clowes's graphic novel Ghost World, ecocriticism in Paul Chadwick's long-running Concrete series, and political philosophies in Herg�'s perennially popular The Adventures of Tintin. Modern political concerns inform Terry Kading's discussion of how superhero comics have responded to 9/11 and how the genre reflects the anxieties of the contemporary world. Essayists also explore the issues surrounding the development and appreciation of comics. Amy Kiste Nyberg examines the rise of the Comics Code, using it as a springboard for discussing the ethics of censorship and child protection in America. Stanford W. Carpenter uses interviews to analyze how a team of Marvel artists and writers reimagined the origin of one of Marvel's most iconic superheroes, Captain America. Throughout, essayists in Comics as Philosophy show how well the form can be used by its artists and its interpreters as a means of philosophical inquiry.

45 review for Comics As Philosophy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jules Galette

    Worthless. Less of a book looking at comics as espousing certain philosophical beliefs or using comics to explore certain philosophical ideals, it's more an enthographic look at comics and than anything else and it doesn't even do that well.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kisholi

    Got through about 2-3 essays but too bored to continue.

  3. 5 out of 5

    jonathan berger

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ross Chiasson

  6. 5 out of 5

    John

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cristina Chenowith

  8. 5 out of 5

    Eugene booker

  9. 4 out of 5

    John

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ian Branam

  11. 4 out of 5

    .Heliana

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karna Mustaqim

  13. 5 out of 5

    Erica

  14. 5 out of 5

    Norman Van Der Linde

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jeff McLaughlin

  16. 5 out of 5

    Indah Threez Lestari

  17. 5 out of 5

    Will

  18. 4 out of 5

    Collin

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

  21. 5 out of 5

    Edward Belfield

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adrian

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cem

  24. 4 out of 5

    Crystalline B.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Siddartha

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christophe Dony

  27. 4 out of 5

    Seda

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dixiana

  30. 4 out of 5

    Davor Nikolic

  31. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

  32. 4 out of 5

    Nolan

  33. 5 out of 5

    Faiz Shariff

  34. 5 out of 5

    G

  35. 5 out of 5

    Zhansaya

  36. 4 out of 5

    Farouk Adil

  37. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  38. 4 out of 5

    Tony

  39. 5 out of 5

    Mike Hibbert

  40. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  41. 4 out of 5

    Thrown With Great Force

  42. 4 out of 5

    Galaxy

  43. 4 out of 5

    Parth Zalavadia

  44. 5 out of 5

    Peter Green

  45. 5 out of 5

    Chad Brock

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